Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to hear opinions on below code snippet. Is there anything that can be improved? Is the event handler/raiser naming following best practices? I know it is not that useful to handle and raise events in the same class but this is just a snippet.

public class MyControl
{
    public MyControl()
    {
        this.LogWritten += this.HandleMyControlLogWritten;
    }

    // Event handler
    void HandleMyControlLogWritten(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
    }

    // Event object
    public event Action<object, EventArgs> LogWritten;

    // Event raiser
    protected virtual void OnLogWritten(EventArgs e)
    {
        if (this.LogWritten != null)
        {
            this.LogWritten(this, e);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The main change I'd recommend would be to get a copy of the event handler:

// Event raiser
protected virtual void OnLogWritten(EventArgs e)
{
    var handler = this.LogWritten;
    if (handler != null)
    {
        handler(this, e);
    }
}

This is important if you're planning to (eventually) use this class in a multi-threaded scenario. As such, I find that it's a good "best practice" to get into the habit of using. The issue is that, when using in multiple threads, without creating the copy, it's possible that the only "handler" attached could unsubscribe between the null check and the invocation, which would cause a runtime error. By copying to a temporary variable (the var handler = this.LogWritten;) line, you're effectively creating a "snapshot" of the subscriber list, and then checking it for null and invoking if required.

The other change is in the event declaration itself. Instead of using Action<T1,T2>:

// Event object
public event Action<object, EventArgs> LogWritten;

I would recommend using EventHandler<TEventArgs> (if you want to use a custom EventArgs subclass) or EventHandler (for standard EventArgs). These are more "standard practice", and will be what other developers expect:

// Event object
public event EventHandler LogWritten;
share|improve this answer
2  
While I agree, it's probably worth explaining why that's a good idea. –  Jon Skeet May 27 '11 at 16:49
    
@Jon: Yeah, I was writing it up at the time ;) –  Reed Copsey May 27 '11 at 16:54
    
Oh nice, almost forgot that it wouldn't be possible alter a delegate's invocation list while invoking the delegate. Slick reminder. –  Teoman Soygul May 27 '11 at 16:56
    
@Teoman: I also just edited to add one more suggested change... –  Reed Copsey May 27 '11 at 16:57
    
@Reed, outstanding answer much appreciated. By the way any thoughts on handler naming: 'HandleMyControlLogWritten' vs 'MyControlLogWrittenHandle' or else.. –  Teoman Soygul May 27 '11 at 17:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.