Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Similar to this answer, I have a pair of 3D numpy arrays, a and b, and I want to sort the entries of b by the values of a. Unlike this answer, I want to sort only along one axis of the arrays.

My naive reading of the numpy.argsort() documentation:

Returns
-------
index_array : ndarray, int
    Array of indices that sort `a` along the specified axis.
    In other words, ``a[index_array]`` yields a sorted `a`.

led me to believe that I could do my sort with the following code:

import numpy

a = numpy.zeros((3, 3, 3))
a += numpy.array((1, 3, 2)).reshape((3, 1, 1))
print "a"
print a
"""
[[[ 1.  1.  1.]
  [ 1.  1.  1.]
  [ 1.  1.  1.]]

 [[ 3.  3.  3.]
  [ 3.  3.  3.]
  [ 3.  3.  3.]]

 [[ 2.  2.  2.]
  [ 2.  2.  2.]
  [ 2.  2.  2.]]]
"""
b = numpy.arange(3*3*3).reshape((3, 3, 3))
print "b"
print b
"""
[[[ 0  1  2]
  [ 3  4  5]
  [ 6  7  8]]

 [[ 9 10 11]
  [12 13 14]
  [15 16 17]]

 [[18 19 20]
  [21 22 23]
  [24 25 26]]]
"""
print "a, sorted"
print numpy.sort(a, axis=0)
"""
[[[ 1.  1.  1.]
  [ 1.  1.  1.]
  [ 1.  1.  1.]]

 [[ 2.  2.  2.]
  [ 2.  2.  2.]
  [ 2.  2.  2.]]

 [[ 3.  3.  3.]
  [ 3.  3.  3.]
  [ 3.  3.  3.]]]
"""

##This isnt' working how I'd like
sort_indices = numpy.argsort(a, axis=0)
c = b[sort_indices]
"""
Desired output:

[[[ 0  1  2]
  [ 3  4  5]
  [ 6  7  8]]

 [[18 19 20]
  [21 22 23]
  [24 25 26]]

 [[ 9 10 11]
  [12 13 14]
  [15 16 17]]]
"""
print "Desired shape of b[sort_indices]: (3, 3, 3)."
print "Actual shape of b[sort_indices]:"
print c.shape
"""
(3, 3, 3, 3, 3)
"""

What's the right way to do this?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You still have to supply indices for the other two dimensions for this to work correctly.

>>> a = numpy.zeros((3, 3, 3))
>>> a += numpy.array((1, 3, 2)).reshape((3, 1, 1))
>>> b = numpy.arange(3*3*3).reshape((3, 3, 3))
>>> sort_indices = numpy.argsort(a, axis=0)
>>> static_indices = numpy.indices((3, 3, 3))
>>> b[sort_indices, static_indices[1], static_indices[2]]
array([[[ 0,  1,  2],
        [ 3,  4,  5],
        [ 6,  7,  8]],

       [[18, 19, 20],
        [21, 22, 23],
        [24, 25, 26]],

       [[ 9, 10, 11],
        [12, 13, 14],
        [15, 16, 17]]])

numpy.indices calculates the indices of each axis of the array when "flattened" through the other two axes (or n - 1 axes where n = total number of axes). In other words, this (apologies for the long post):

>>> static_indices
array([[[[0, 0, 0],
         [0, 0, 0],
         [0, 0, 0]],

        [[1, 1, 1],
         [1, 1, 1],
         [1, 1, 1]],

        [[2, 2, 2],
         [2, 2, 2],
         [2, 2, 2]]],


       [[[0, 0, 0],
         [1, 1, 1],
         [2, 2, 2]],

        [[0, 0, 0],
         [1, 1, 1],
         [2, 2, 2]],

        [[0, 0, 0],
         [1, 1, 1],
         [2, 2, 2]]],


       [[[0, 1, 2],
         [0, 1, 2],
         [0, 1, 2]],

        [[0, 1, 2],
         [0, 1, 2],
         [0, 1, 2]],

        [[0, 1, 2],
         [0, 1, 2],
         [0, 1, 2]]]])

These are the identity indices for each axis; when used to index b, they recreate b.

>>> b[static_indices[0], static_indices[1], static_indices[2]]
array([[[ 0,  1,  2],
        [ 3,  4,  5],
        [ 6,  7,  8]],

       [[ 9, 10, 11],
        [12, 13, 14],
        [15, 16, 17]],

       [[18, 19, 20],
        [21, 22, 23],
        [24, 25, 26]]])

As an alternative to numpy.indices, you could use numpy.ogrid, as unutbu suggests. Since the object generated by ogrid is smaller, I'll create all three axes, just for consistency sake, but note unutbu's comment for a way to do this by generating only two.

>>> static_indices = numpy.ogrid[0:a.shape[0], 0:a.shape[1], 0:a.shape[2]]
>>> a[sort_indices, static_indices[1], static_indices[2]]
array([[[ 1.,  1.,  1.],
        [ 1.,  1.,  1.],
        [ 1.,  1.,  1.]],

       [[ 2.,  2.,  2.],
        [ 2.,  2.,  2.],
        [ 2.,  2.,  2.]],

       [[ 3.,  3.,  3.],
        [ 3.,  3.,  3.],
        [ 3.,  3.,  3.]]])
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent, thanks! –  Andrew May 28 '11 at 14:01
    
I like this answer. To save some memory, perhaps change static_indices to static_indices = np.ogrid[0:a.shape[1],0:a.shape[2]]. This will produce smaller arrays, but will do the same thing as np.indices by taking advantage of broadcasting. It could be used like this: b[sort_indices, static_indices[1], static_indices[2]]. –  unutbu May 28 '11 at 16:26
    
Err, b[sort_indices, static_indices[0], static_indices[1]] rather. –  unutbu May 28 '11 at 17:01
    
@unutbu, thanks! I'm still getting to know numpy's very rich indexing system; it's nice to know about an automatic way to generate broadcastable indices. –  senderle May 28 '11 at 17:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.