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I have a following problem I want to solve ellegantly:

public interface IMyclass
{
} 
public class A
{
   public void Init(IMyclass class){?}
   public IMyclass CreateMyClass(){?}
}

At the start of the system I want to define dynamic type of IMyClass by using Init() and during the run of the system i would like to create new instances of the type I defined at init.

Notes:
1. IMyclass must be interface
2. The dynamic type of IMyclass known only at init (i have no constructor after :) )
3. I could do it using a reflection or definition method clone at IMyclass is there any better solutions?

Thank you.

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You may want to take note that your coding conventions are non-standard. I for interface declarations and caps for a method are not typically used in Java. (Some will argue the interface one, but Eclipse is the only major bit of code I have ever seen it used in). –  Robin May 27 '11 at 18:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could pass a provider into class A

public class A
{ 
   IMyClassProvider _provider;

   public void Init(IMyClassProvider provider) 
   {
        _provider = provider; 
   }

   public IMyclass CreateMyClass()
   {
        return _provider.Create();
   }
}

Or maybe with a constructor delegate

public class A
{ 
   Func<IMyclass> _ctor;

   public void Init(Func<IMyclass> ctor) 
   {
        _ctor = ctor; 
   }

   public IMyclass CreateMyClass()
   {
        return _ctor();
   }
}

Note that both of these examples will blow up if Init has not been called before CreateMyClass, you would need some checking or better is doing your init in the constructor.

Have I understood the question correctly?

share|improve this answer
    
Could you please explain what do you mean by provider or supply usage code? –  Sergey Kucher May 27 '11 at 17:59
    
I'm just leaving work, will update later if you haven't solved it by then –  fearofawhackplanet May 27 '11 at 18:04
    
Yes you understood the question correctly. –  Sergey Kucher May 27 '11 at 18:06
    
I just realised that your question is tagged as Java and I have answered using C# code. It should be possible to apply similar patterns in Java but I'm not so familiar with the syntax. –  fearofawhackplanet May 27 '11 at 22:31
    
I understood that :) but your solution is language independent at java you have Command pattern for delegation. Thank you –  Sergey Kucher May 28 '11 at 7:23

This is a kind of dependency injection, you should read:

Basically, you have a class A that is populated with factories (or providers) at initialization. Then you use A instead of calling new.

A quick example:

interface Provider<V> {
   V instance(Object... args);
}
class Dispatch {
   // you can make a singleton out of this class
   Map<Class, Provider> map;
   <T> void register(Class<T> cl, Provider<? extends T> p) {
      // you can also bind to superclasses of cl
      map.put(cl, p);
   }
   <T, I extends T> void register(Class<T> cl, final Class<I> impl) {
      register(cl, new Provider<I>() {
         I instance(Object... args) {
            // this class should be refactored and put in a separate file
            // a constructor with arguments could be found based on types of args values
            // moreover, exceptions should be handled
            return impl.newInstace();
         }
      });
   }
   <T> T instance(Class<T> cl, Object... args) {
      return map.get(cl).instance(args);
   }
}

// usage
interface MyIf { ... }
class MyIfImpl implements MyIf { ... }

Dispatch d = new Dispatch();
d.register(MyIf.class, new Provider<MyIf>() {
   MyIf instance(Object... args) {
      return new MyIfImpl();
   }
});
// or just
d.register(MyIf.class, MyIfImpl.class);
MyIf i = d.instance(MyIf.class);

Edit: added register(Class, Class)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, you have an excelent solution for this problem and i learned form it a lot but I would like to avoid using reflection. –  Sergey Kucher May 27 '11 at 18:53
    
If you want to do it without reflection, just drop the function register(Class, Class), it may be handy, but isn't quite type-safe. –  Kru May 27 '11 at 19:01

If you just want to instantiate the same class in CreateMyClass() without further configuration you can use reflection.

public class A
{
    private Class prototype;

    public void Init(IMyClass object) {
        this.prototype = object.getClass();
    }

    public IMyClass CreateMyClass() {
        return prototype.newInstance();
    }
}

I suspect you want more than this, and if so you'll need to explain how you want to use this. You may be looking for the Builder or Factory patterns.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you this solves the problem. But can you tell me what about the performance issue - this parameter I create very frequently. If it could cause performance issue do you have any solution without involving reflection? –  Sergey Kucher May 27 '11 at 18:10
    
Thank you very much! –  Sergey Kucher May 27 '11 at 18:51
    
If you want to dynamically instantiate objects based on the class of another at runtime, no. But if you will have only a handful of such classes to do this for you may as well write individual factories for each class fearofawhackplanet demonstrated. –  David Harkness May 27 '11 at 22:08

You'll need Reflection at some point due to visibility. If you can accept Reflection once up-front and not have to use it again, that would probably be ideal, yes?

You could put a getInstance() method on a hidden interface (located in the same package as IMyClass, MyClassImpl, and A, but not ClientOfA), and then pass a prototype of MyClassImpl to A.init().

// -- You wish you would have thought of the word prototypeable! ...maybe?
interface IMyClassPrototypeable extends IMyClass
{
 public IMyClass getInstance();
}

class MyClassImpl implements IMyClassPrototypeable // -- and IMyClass by extension.
{
 // -- Still not visible outside this package.
 public IMyClass getInstance()
 {
  return new MyClassImpl();
 }
}

class A
{
 private IMyClassPrototypeable prototype;

 // -- This method is package-private.
 void init( IMyClassPrototypeable prototype )
 {
  this.prototype = prototype;
 }

 public IMyClass createMyClass()
 {
  return prototype.getInstance();
 }
}

This solution would require Reflection to create the prototype instance of MyClassImpl, which could be done via Spring (or some other form of dependency injection). It uses the Prototype pattern, the Factory-method pattern, and readily supports the Singleton/Pool pattern, but remember that more design patterns used is not always better. In fact, it can make the design (and code) more complex and more difficult for a beginner to understand.

For the record, the only reason I would even think about advocating this solution is because it takes the reflection hit once, up front, rather than every time createMyClass() is called, which the original poster indicated he/she would be doing frequently.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you its very good solution!! –  Sergey Kucher May 27 '11 at 20:57

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