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Why can't I set a public member variable using a function?

<?

class TestClass {

    public $thisWorks = "something";

    public $currentDir = dirname( __FILE__ );

    public function TestClass()
    {
        print $this->thisWorks . "\n";
        print $this->currentDir . "\n";
    }

}

$myClass = new TestClass();

?>

Running it yields:

Parse error: syntax error, unexpected '(', expecting ',' or ';' in /tmp/tmp.php on line 7
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4  
You cannot have expressions in the variable declarations. You can only use constant values. –  mario May 27 '11 at 17:55
    
@mario: That's an answer, not a comment. –  delnan May 27 '11 at 17:57
    
@delnan: It's just that I like to avoid one-liners as answers; but crafted some fill text now.. –  mario May 27 '11 at 17:58

9 Answers 9

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You cannot have expressions in the variable declarations. You can only use constant values. The dirname() may not appear in this position.

If you were to use PHP 5.3 you could use:

  public $currentDir = __DIR__ ;

Otherwise you will have to initialize $this->currentDir in the __constructor.

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+1. And the OP should use print $this->thisWorks;. –  Jürgen Thelen May 27 '11 at 17:59
    
+1 nice solution. –  martynthewolf May 27 '11 at 18:03
    
@Jürgen : thanks! Fixed... –  TrinitronX May 27 '11 at 18:03

As per the PHP manual, your instance variables:

must be able to be evaluated at compile time and must not depend on run-time information in order to be evaluated

As such, you can't use the dirname function in the property initialisation. Therefore, simply use a constructor to set the default value via:

public function __construct() {
    $this->currentDir = dirname( __FILE__ );
}
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You cannot call functions when you specify attributes.

Use this instead:

<?php

class TestClass{

    public $currentDir = null;

    public function TestClass()
    {
        $this->currentDir = dirname(__FILE__);
        /* the rest here */
    }
}
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This code makes no sense at all. A public global variable? A public global function named TestClass? –  Nicklas A. May 27 '11 at 18:04
    
Sorry I forgot to copy-paste the class definition –  Yeroon May 27 '11 at 18:20
    
They've changed the constructors name to __construct :) –  Nicklas A. May 27 '11 at 18:25
    
They haven't changed it, they just added __construct at some point (PHP5?). The name of the class as constructor still works UNLESS you are using PHP5.3.3 or higher (php.net/releases/5_3_3.php) AND your class is inside a namespace. –  Yeroon May 27 '11 at 21:29
    
But they are moving away from that naming convention. –  Nicklas A. May 27 '11 at 21:41

Looks like you can not call functions when specifying default values for member variables.

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You can't call functions to declare class variables, sadly. You could, however, assign the return value from dirname( FILE ) to $this->currentDir from within the constructor.

EDIT: Mind you: the constructor in PHP => 5 is called __construct( ), not the name of the class.

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You can use this instead:

public $currentDir = '';

public function TestClass()
{
    $this->currentDir = dirname( __FILE__ );
    ...
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The dirname expression is causing the error you can not declare an expression as a variable there. You could do this though.

<?

class TestClass {

    public $thisWorks = "something";
    public $currentDir;

    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->currentDir = dirname( __FILE__ );
    }

    public function test()
    {
        echo $this->currentDir;
    }
}

Everytime you instantiate a new class the dirname will be set in the constructor. I also recommend omitting the closing php tag ?> in your files. Helps to alleviate and header sent errors

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The reason is that you cannot assign instance variables using functions in a static manner. It is simply not allowed in PHP.

May I suggest you do this:

<?
class Foo {
    public $currentDir;

    public function __construct() {
        $this->currentDir = dirname(__FILE__);
    }
}
?>
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2  
This statement is way too broad and wrong (propably just worded carelessly, but still). –  delnan May 27 '11 at 17:57

do it in the constructor. $this->currentDir = dirname( FILE );

and by the way print $currentDir . "\n"; use $this when calling vars in class

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