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Hi I have had a problem with some method that should perform action on some IEnumerator object instance, the code sample shows the case:

class Program
    {        
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string[] testArray = { "Item1", "Item2" };

            var query = testArray.Select((item, index) => new { index, item });

            Console.WriteLine("Query run 1, {0}", Environment.NewLine);

            foreach (var obj in query)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("{0}", obj);
            }

            Console.WriteLine("Query run 2, {0}", Environment.NewLine);

            doAction<object>(query as IEnumerator<object>, obj => Console.WriteLine(obj) );


            Console.WriteLine("Query run 3 ( same as run 1), {0}", Environment.NewLine);

            foreach (var obj in query)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("{0}", obj);
            }

            Object tmp = Console.ReadLine();
        }


        private static void doAction<T>(IEnumerator<T> enumerator, Action<T> action)
        {

            if (enumerator == null)
            {
                throw new ArgumentNullException("enumerator");
            }

            if (action == null)
            {
                throw new ArgumentNullException("action");
            }


            while (enumerator.MoveNext())
            {
                action(enumerator.Current);
            }

        }
    }

The output:

Query run 1,

{ index = 0, item = Item1 }
{ index = 1, item = Item2 }
Query run2,

Query run 3 ( same as run 1), 

{ index = 0, item = Item1 }
{ index = 1, item = Item2 }

Does anyone know what method doAction do not take action ?

The real problem is that i need the answer in English language, because my is really bad and i can not explain why this is happening to my mate.

Thanks in advance.

Thnaks.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes - you shouldn't be using IEnumerator<T> directly, only IEnumerable<T>. Basically you're seeing an oddity of the way that the C# compiler implements iterator blocks: there's one type which implements both IEnumerable<T> and IEnumerator<T>. That's unusual in itself, but is done for performance reasons. It's not something you should take advantage of or rely on.

Fundamentally, casting an IEnumerable<T> to IEnumerator<T> is a bad idea - you shouldn't do it. They're different interfaces representing subtly different ideas - the difference between "a sequence which can be iterated over" and "something which is iterating over a sequence".

If you really want to use IEnumerator<T> as the parameter type for doAction (which would normally be DoAction, btw) just call GetEnumerator() instead:

using (var iterator = query.GetEnumerator())
{
    doAction<object>(iterator, obj => Console.WriteLine(obj) );
}
share|improve this answer
    
How could someone make that mistake? When processing the results of a linq query don't use IEnumerator<T> Interface which "Supports a simple iteration over a generic collection." Instead use IEnumerable<T> Interface which "Exposes the enumerator, which supports a simple iteration over a collection of a specified type." –  Conrad Frix May 27 '11 at 18:27
    
Thank You. Not so many words and so much information, great answer. –  Damian Leszczyński - Vash May 27 '11 at 18:27

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