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Suppose the call was

/usr/local/bin/perl verify.pl 1 3 de# > result.log

Inside verify.pl I want to capture the whole call above and append it to a log file for tracking purposes.

How can I capture the whole call as it is?

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5 Answers

There is way (at least on unix-systems) to get whole command line:

my $cmdline = `ps -o args -C perl | grep verify.pl`;
print $cmdline, "\n";

e: Cleaner way using PID (courtesy of Nathan Fellman):

print qx/ps -o args $$/;
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That's good, unless you have more than one instance of perl running. You can filter that out with getpid() –  Nathan Fellman May 28 '11 at 7:28
    
@Nathan Fellman: Yes, there may be some issues to get the right one from processes, but i think OP can decide himself, how to properly filter specific process. By PID or by some grep pattern or ... –  w.k May 28 '11 at 7:55
2  
I was thinking of using something like print qx/ps -o args $$/; –  Nathan Fellman May 28 '11 at 8:18
    
@Nathan Fellman: seems the cleanest way, no doubt! –  w.k May 28 '11 at 10:20
1  
This doesn't appear to maintain the shell quoting that was used on the command line, which may be a problem depending on what the original command line is needed for. –  a'r Dec 6 '11 at 16:45
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$0 has the script name and @ARGV has the arguments, so the whole commandline is:

$commandline = $0 . " ". (join " ", @ARGV);

or, more elegantly (thanks FMc):

$commandline = join " ", $0, @ARGV;

I don't however, know how to capture the redirection (> result.log)

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$commandline = $0 . " " . (join " ", @ARGV); to get a space between the scriptname and the first parameter, but that is just stupid detail –  Fredrik Pihl May 27 '11 at 19:28
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I don't think you can, since the shell just dups the file descriptor for STDOUT to point to that log file. Perl has no way of knowing whether this has happened, as far as I can tell. (You MIGHT be able to detect whether an input redirection has happened by using -t though.) –  Platinum Azure May 27 '11 at 19:31
3  
FWIW, join takes multiple arguments: join(" ", $0, @ARGV). –  FMc May 27 '11 at 19:35
1  
The path to the perl executable can be accessed at runtime with $^X or with $Config{perlpath} (if you have loaded the Config module). $Config{perlpath} is preferable in some cases because it is a read-only variable. –  mob May 27 '11 at 20:13
1  
There is no way to capture redirection. It's managed by the shell, i.e. the shell (bash, sh, cmd -- whatever) will open the file(s) and then run the command without >'s. However, one can guess whether certain file handle is a terminal, a file, or a pipe. –  Dallaylaen May 27 '11 at 20:30
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$commandline = join " ", $0, @ARGV; does not handle the case that command line has quotes such as ./xxx.pl --love "dad and mom"

A Quick Solution:

my $script_command = $0;
foreach (@ARGV) {
$script_command .= /\s/ ?   " \'" . $_ . "\'"
                :           " "   . $_;
}

Try to save the following code as xxx.pl and run ./xxx.pl --love "dad and mom":

#!/usr/bin/env perl -w
use strict;
use feature qw ( say );
say "A: " . join( " ", $0, @ARGV );
my $script_command = $0;
foreach (@ARGV) {
    $script_command .= /\s/ ?   " \'" . $_ . "\'"
                    :           " "   . $_;
}
say "B: " . $script_command;
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Here virtually same Linux-only variants (of course, after shell intervention):

pure perl

BEGIN {
    my @cmd = ( );
    if (open(my $h, "<:raw", "/proc/$$/cmdline")) {
        # precisely, buffer size must be at least `getconf ARG_MAX`
        read($h, my $buf, 1048576); close($h);
        @cmd = split(/\0/s, $buf);
    };
    print join("\n\t", @cmd), "\n";
};

using File::Slurp:

BEGIN {
    use File::Slurp;
    my @cmd = split(/\0/s, File::Slurp::read_file("/proc/$$/cmdline", {binmode => ":raw"}));
    print join("\n\t", @cmd), "\n";
};
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