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Is there a way to enforce that a type parameter passed to an attribute implement specific interface?

public interface IExpectedInterface
{
    void InterfaceMethod();
}

public class MyCustomAttribute : Attribute
{
    public MyCustomAttribute(Type classType)
    {
        this.ConfirmAssignedClassType();

        _classType = classType;
    }

    public void SomeMethod<T>() where T : IExpectedInterface, new()
    {
        //var expectedType = Activator.CreateInstance(this._classType) as IExpectedInterface;
        var expectedType = Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T)) as IExpectedInterface;

        if (expectedType == null)
        {
            // Wrong type

            throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("Wrong type: {0} could not be created or converted to IActionAuthorization", _classType.ToString()));
        }

        // Do something with expectedType

        expectedType.InterfaceMethod();
    }

    private void ConfirmAssignedClassType()
    {
        if (!typeof(IExpectedInterface).IsAssignableFrom(_classType))
        {
            // Wrong type
            // Can we enforce it via language construct

            throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("Wrong type: {0} must implement IExpectedInterface", _classType.ToString()));
        }

        if (this._classType.GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes) == null)
        {
            // Wrong type
            // Can we enforce it via language construct

            throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("Wrong type: {0} must have parameter less constructor", _classType.ToString()));
        }
    }

    private Type _classType;
}

public class TestClass
{
    [MyCustom(typeof(TestClassImplementsExpectedInterface))]
    public void TestMethod1()
    {
    }

    [MyCustom(typeof(TestClassDoesntImplementExpectedInterface))]
    public void TestMethod2()
    {
    }
}

public class TestClassImplementsExpectedInterface : IExpectedInterface
{
    public void InterfaceMethod()
    {
        return;
    }
}

public class TestClassDoesntImplementExpectedInterface
{
}
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Couldn't this be done with generics? (Edited -- cannot create a generic subclass of Attribute)

   public class MyAttribute: Attribute 
    {
        private Type _ClassType;
        public MyAttribute(Type classType)
        {
            _ClassType = classType;
        }
        public void SomeMethod<T>() where T: IMyInterface
        {
            var expectedType = Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T)) as IMyInterface;
        // Do something with expectedType
        }
    }

And of course the other answer's translation to use "new" makes a lot of sense!

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1  
Not according to this msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173129(v=VS.100).aspx –  Duncan Howe May 27 '11 at 19:34
    
@Duncan - you're right! I'll modify my answer... –  Adam Ralph May 27 '11 at 19:35
    
You are correct, and in fact, it does not compile with a very specific error! I threw something into VS and there were no intellisense errors, so I wrongly assumed it was valid. How odd. –  Jamie Treworgy May 27 '11 at 19:35
    
... so on to the "if you really wanted" alternative. –  Jamie Treworgy May 27 '11 at 19:38
    
I only know because I had the same idea and thought I would see if it would work... –  Duncan Howe May 27 '11 at 19:39

If for some reason you don't want to mess with generics (such as putting all the attributes into a list or something), there is what might be considered a slightly better way, though still without compile-time checking. You can call the Type.IsAssignableFrom method, instead of calling Activator.CreateInstance (which might or might not work depending on whether there are 0-param ctors) (though it seems like you assume that there is a 0-param ctor, so this might be somewhat moot).

if (!typeof(SomeInterface).IsAssignableFrom(_ClassType)))
// Throw exception
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This is probably the better way to go then - if you were to store the Type parameter in a property, and put this code in the setter, your attribute would enforce the interface inheritance implicitly. –  Duncan Howe May 27 '11 at 19:51

You can convert your method to being generic, e.g.

public class MyAttribute : Attribute
{
    public void SomeMethod<T>() where T : ISomeInterface, new()
    {
        var expectedType = new T();
        // Do something with expectedType
    }
}

The new() type constraint means that the type must have a public, parameterless constructor which means you can do new T(). This removes the need to use Activator.

Note that, as Duncan Howe points out, a generic type cannot inherit from Attribute, so you cannot do public class MyAttribute<T> : Attribute

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Doesn't make any difference in compile time, see updated code. –  amit_g May 27 '11 at 20:08
    
I'm not sure what you mean. this should work if your intention is to limit the types that can be used to only those inheriting from a given interface –  Adam Ralph May 27 '11 at 20:37
    
Within the attribute I don't know the concrete type. So this compiles even though in the TestMethod2 the attribute is passed incorrect type. –  amit_g May 27 '11 at 20:44
    
The attribute I am working with is actually ActionFilterAttribute. So I am not really calling any method on it. I am only overriding some methods. –  amit_g May 27 '11 at 20:47

Why do you not just pass the object in through the constructor (e.g. Public MyAttribute(IMyInterface myObject)) and store it in a property. Then if you need the type, explicitly call typeof(myObjectProperty).

share|improve this answer
    
Any attribute arguments must be constants, typeof expressions, and can't be things like "new Foo()". –  Jamie May 27 '11 at 19:37
    
Very true - should have known (I've been in that pit!) –  Duncan Howe May 27 '11 at 19:43

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