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Simple question really; is there a difference between these values (and is there a difference between BOOL and bool)? A co-worker mentioned that they evaluate to different things in Objective-C, but when I looked at the typedefs in their respective .h files, YES/TRUE/true were all defined as 1 and NO/FALSE/false were all defined as 0. Is there really any difference?

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2  
From a practical standpoint there is no difference. You can probably do various tricks to demonstrate a difference, but you'd generally be straying into "undefined behavior" territory. –  Hot Licks Jan 21 '12 at 19:03

7 Answers 7

up vote 52 down vote accepted

There is no practical difference provided you use BOOL variables as booleans. C processes boolean expressions based on whether they evaluate to 0 or not 0. So:

if(someVar ) { ... }
if(!someVar) { ... }

means the same as

if(someVar!=0) { ... }
if(someVar==0) { ... }

which is why you can evaluate any primitive type or expression as a boolean test (including, e.g. pointers). Note that you should do the former, not the latter.

Note that there is a difference if you assign obtuse values to a so-called BOOL variable and test for specific values, so always use them as booleans and only assign them from their #define values.

Importantly, never test booleans using a character comparison -- it's not only risky because someVar could be assigned a non-zero value which is not YES, but, in my opinion more importantly, it fails to express the intent correctly:

if(someVar==YES) { ... } // don't do this!
if(someVar==NO ) { ... } // don't do this either!

In other words, use constructs as they are intended and documented to be used and you'll spare yourself from a world of hurt in C.

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I believe there is a difference between bool and BOOL, check out this webpage for an explanation of why:
http://iphonedevelopertips.com/objective-c/of-bool-and-yes.html

Because BOOL is an unsigned char rather than a primitive type, variables of type BOOL can contain values other than YES and NO.

Consider this code:

BOOL b = 42;

if (b) {
    printf("b is not NO!\n");
}

if (b != YES) {
    printf("b is not YES!\n");
}

The output is:

b is not NO!
b is not YES!

For most people this is an unnecessary concern, but if you really want a boolean it is better to use a bool. I should add: the iOS SDK generally uses BOOL on its interface definitions, so that is an argument to stick with BOOL.

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3  
But note that the original C implementation had no bool, and hence it's been the tradition to use an int or char as a Boolean, sometimes with a #define to hide the difference and sometimes not. In fact, I'm not sure if even current standards require bool to be implemented in a way that prevents examining it's internal structure. –  Hot Licks Jan 21 '12 at 19:01
    
Although, the first printf tells lies. The value of b is not YES, it's "not zero", which is what the condition tests. So you should have printf("b is not zero"), which is not necessarily the same as YES. In this case, b is both "not zero" and "not YES". –  Lawrence Dol Feb 18 '14 at 18:15
    
Thanks Lawrence, I've made an update along those lines. –  Dan J Mar 14 '14 at 17:12

I did an exhaustive test on this. My results should speak for themselves:

//These will all print "1"
NSLog(@"%d", true == true);
NSLog(@"%d", TRUE == true);
NSLog(@"%d", YES  == true);
NSLog(@"%d", true == TRUE);
NSLog(@"%d", TRUE == TRUE);
NSLog(@"%d", YES  == TRUE);
NSLog(@"%d", true == YES);
NSLog(@"%d", TRUE == YES);
NSLog(@"%d", YES  == YES);

NSLog(@"%d", false == false);
NSLog(@"%d", FALSE == false);
NSLog(@"%d", NO    == false);
NSLog(@"%d", false == FALSE);
NSLog(@"%d", FALSE == FALSE);
NSLog(@"%d", NO    == FALSE);
NSLog(@"%d", false == NO);
NSLog(@"%d", FALSE == NO);
NSLog(@"%d", NO    == NO);


//These will all print "0"
NSLog(@"%d", false == true);
NSLog(@"%d", FALSE == true);
NSLog(@"%d", NO    == true);
NSLog(@"%d", false == TRUE);
NSLog(@"%d", FALSE == TRUE);
NSLog(@"%d", NO    == TRUE);
NSLog(@"%d", false == YES);
NSLog(@"%d", FALSE == YES);
NSLog(@"%d", NO    == YES);

NSLog(@"%d", true == false);
NSLog(@"%d", TRUE == false);
NSLog(@"%d", YES  == false);
NSLog(@"%d", true == FALSE);
NSLog(@"%d", TRUE == FALSE);
NSLog(@"%d", YES  == FALSE);
NSLog(@"%d", true == NO);
NSLog(@"%d", TRUE == NO);
NSLog(@"%d", YES  == NO);

The output is:

2013-02-19 20:30:37.061 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 1
2013-02-19 20:30:37.061 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 1
2013-02-19 20:30:37.072 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 1
2013-02-19 20:30:37.073 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 1
2013-02-19 20:30:37.073 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 1
2013-02-19 20:30:37.074 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 1
2013-02-19 20:30:37.074 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 1
2013-02-19 20:30:37.075 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 1
2013-02-19 20:30:37.075 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 1
2013-02-19 20:30:37.076 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 1
2013-02-19 20:30:37.077 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 1
2013-02-19 20:30:37.077 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 1
2013-02-19 20:30:37.078 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 1
2013-02-19 20:30:37.078 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 1
2013-02-19 20:30:37.079 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 1
2013-02-19 20:30:37.079 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 1
2013-02-19 20:30:37.080 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 1
2013-02-19 20:30:37.080 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 1
2013-02-19 20:30:37.081 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 0
2013-02-19 20:30:37.081 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 0
2013-02-19 20:30:37.082 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 0
2013-02-19 20:30:37.091 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 0
2013-02-19 20:30:37.092 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 0
2013-02-19 20:30:37.093 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 0
2013-02-19 20:30:37.093 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 0
2013-02-19 20:30:37.094 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 0
2013-02-19 20:30:37.094 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 0
2013-02-19 20:30:37.095 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 0
2013-02-19 20:30:37.095 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 0
2013-02-19 20:30:37.096 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 0
2013-02-19 20:30:37.096 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 0
2013-02-19 20:30:37.097 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 0
2013-02-19 20:30:37.098 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 0
2013-02-19 20:30:37.101 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 0
2013-02-19 20:30:37.102 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 0
2013-02-19 20:30:37.102 BooleanTests[27433:a0f] 0
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3  
[[NSObject]alloc]init] does not equal TRUE or YES. So testing for object initialization with if ([[NSObject]alloc]init]==TRUE) will fail. I've never been comfortable with a Language defining a singular "true" value when in fact any non zero value will do. –  Samuel Renkert Aug 9 '13 at 15:26
    
@SamuelRenkert I've never been comfortable with a language taking a non-Boolean value in an if or a while. Like... while("guitar gently weeps") shouldn't work... –  Supuhstar Mar 20 at 13:19

You might want to read the answers to this question. In summary, in Objective-C (from the definition in objc.h):

typedef signed char        BOOL; 
// BOOL is explicitly signed so @encode(BOOL) == "c" rather than "C" 
// even if -funsigned-char is used.
#define OBJC_BOOL_DEFINED


#define YES             (BOOL)1
#define NO              (BOOL)0
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I think they add YES/NO to be more self-explanatory in many cases. For example:

[button setHidden:YES];

sounds better than

[button setHidden:TRUE];

Marco

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1  
I disagree; they both read the same, to me. However, in a UI for a lay person I think Yes/No looks nicer. –  Lawrence Dol Jun 24 '11 at 1:23
11  
I disagree as well. If anything, it reads poorly due to not sticking to the unwritten standards that have been used for years in other languages. IE is a prime example of what happens when you fail to adhere to a great number of standards. –  FreeAsInBeer Jul 21 '11 at 23:40
3  
-1 for leaving two answers that could be listed as one –  Supuhstar Feb 20 '13 at 1:36
    
Half downvote for 2 imprecise answers and half downvote for signing your answers –  fpg1503 Mar 19 at 19:10

There is a subtle bug that no one has mentioned here, that I thought I would include... more of a logical error than anything:

int i = 2;
if(i);        //true
if(i==YES);   // false
if(!!i==YES); //true

so the issue here is just that (YES==1) and in C the comparison isn't a boolean one, but one based on value.

because YES is just a #define (rather than something intrinsic to the language), it has to be some value, and 1 makes the most sense.

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No, YES/NO is a different way to refer to TRUE/FALSE(1/0)

Marco

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-1 for not saying why –  Supuhstar Feb 20 '13 at 1:36
    
-1 for not specifying –  vilanovi May 19 '14 at 10:35

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