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This question likely betrays a misconception, but I'm curious what the "Tomcat" of the Python world is.

All of my web programming experience is in Java (or Groovy) so I think in Java terms. And when I think of making a basic web-app, I think of writing some servlets, building a WAR file, and deploying it in Tomcat or another servlet container.

In Python, suppose I wrote some code that was capable of responding to HTTP requests, what would I do with it? How would I deploy it?

Specifically: What is the most commonly used container in Python? And is there an equivalent of a WAR file, a standard packaging of a web-app into one file that works in the various containers?

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There are many web frameworks for Python. Try searching for "Python web framework" to get a list of them. What more do you want to know? Just the list? –  S.Lott May 27 '11 at 19:53
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I'm not looking for a framework, I'm trying to understand how one would make a Python web app without a framework. I'm comparing with Servlets and Tomcat, not with Spring or Struts. –  Eric Wilson May 27 '11 at 19:55
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@FarmBoy: "Servlets and Tomcat" actually is part of a web framework. Sorry, but that's still framework. To get away from Framework, you'd have to be writing sockets or CGI scripts. There are still dozens of Python frameworks that are more-or-less equivalent to Tomcat. Please search and read the results. What do you want to know specifically? –  S.Lott May 27 '11 at 19:59
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@FarmBoy: "isn't there a difference?" No. And there's no "canonical" container. I'm trying to make that as clear as I can. There are many web frameworks for Python. Many. What do you want to know? Do you want the list? That's a poor question. What do you want to do? What information do you want? Please clarify what you're trying to do. –  S.Lott May 27 '11 at 20:04
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I wish I could downvote comments. @S.Lott, you are not being helpful here to FarmBoy's honest questions. And yes, there is a difference: Tomcat, as ThiefMaster points out, equates to the WSGI server, not the framework. –  Daniel Roseman May 27 '11 at 20:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 26 down vote accepted

There are different approaches which have one thing in common: They usually communicate via WSGI with their "container" (the server receiving the HTTP requests before they go to your Python code).

There are various containers:

  • wsgiref - a very simple reference implementation which is nice during development
  • Apache with mod_wsgi
  • most other Webservers with a module adding WSGI support
  • many more
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this is the closest thing to the Servlet API part of the J2EE specification in the Python world. –  Jarrod Roberson May 27 '11 at 20:49
    
Thanks, this is helpful. –  Eric Wilson May 27 '11 at 21:57
    
Just to add to this answer that if you are looking for a comprehensive application server (like jboss/websphere), not just a container (like Tomcat), then the only one I can think of is Zope. –  Burhan Khalid Mar 2 '13 at 14:14

when I think of making a basic web-app, I think of writing some servlets, building a WAR file, and deploying it in Tomcat or another servlet container.

That's nice, but irrelevant. That's just a Java-ism, and doesn't apply very widely outside Java.

In Python, suppose I wrote some code that was capable of responding to HTTP requests, what would I do with it? How would I deploy it?

That depends.

What is the most commonly used container in Python?

There isn't one.

And is there an equivalent of a WAR file, a standard packaging of a web-app into one file that works in the various containers?

There isn't one.


HTTP is a protocol for producing a response to a request. That's it. It's really a very small thing.

You have CGI scripts which can respond to a request. The Python cgi library can do that. http://docs.python.org/library/cgi.html.

This is relatively inefficient because the simple CGI rule is "fire off a new process for each request." It can also be insecure if the script allows elevated privileges or badly planned-out uploads.

You have the mod_wsgi framework to connect Apache to Python. This can behave like CGI, or it can have a dedicated Python "daemon" running at the end of a named pipe.

The WSGI standard defines a format for request and response processing that's very handy and very extensible. Most of the frameworks -- in one way or another -- are WSGI compatible.

Finally, there are more complete frameworks that include class definitions for requests and responses, URL parsing, Authentication, Authorization, etc., etc.

Here's a list: http://wiki.python.org/moin/WebFrameworks

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Maybe 'uwsgi' will help. Here is the link:http://projects.unbit.it/uwsgi/

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There are many web-servers available for python. Some of the webservers like CherryPy was written in Python itself. The most coolest part of the answer is that tomcat server itself support Python-based applications.

For further details look into this site: https://wiki.python.org/moin/WebServers

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Using Tomcat is only possible with Jython, not for an arbitrary Python web application. –  Eric Wilson Mar 26 '14 at 9:54

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