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First of all, I apologize that this question is so vague. I can't remember what this is called, or how they work, so it's very difficult to start searching or formulate a good title.

I have two questions wrapped into one:

First:

How are objects converted to other types internally? What is this called?

Example:

$Obj{
    $value = 1;
    $other = 2;
    $more = 3;
}

$myObj = (string)$Obj;

print $myObj; // prints "1, 2, 3" or something like that

Second:

Can this method be used in math? Is there some override function that recognizes when an Object is being used in math?

Example:

$Obj{
        $value = 1;
        $other = 2;
        $more = 3;
    }

$result = 4 / $Obj;

print $result; // prints ".66666667" or something similar (sum of all properties)

Update:

I think it might have something to do with serialize(), but I know I've heard of a case where this is done "automatically" without having to call serialize() and it's done in a way that doesn't actually serialize the whole object, it just converts it to a useable value, like my above examples.

Final:

Thanks for @trey for being right about it being casting and to @webbiedave for pointing me to the magic method __toString.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It is casting as you can define the magic method __toString to allow the object to be cast to a string as desired, which will then allow PHP to cast it to an int or float in math.

Take the following example:

class A
{
    public $value = 1;
    public $other = 2;
    public $more  = 3;

    public function __toString()
    {
        return (string)($this->value + $this->other + $this->more);
    }
}

$obj = new A();
echo 4 / (string)$obj; // outputs 0.66666666666667 
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So I assume it's best practice to actually return a string, given the name, but can __toString() return theoretically anything? Is there a more generic function that allows you to catch any cast? –  rockerest May 27 '11 at 21:24
    
You must return a string or it will cause a fatal error. PHP does not offer other types of magic cast methods. –  webbiedave May 27 '11 at 21:25
    
I was late, good info, I won't keep looking for other magic methods;) –  Trey May 27 '11 at 21:31

It's called type casting when you change an object to a different data type, as for the second part, I'm not entirely sure I understand you, are you trying to type cast during a math function?

it sounds like this may be more along the lines of what you're looking for:

class User
{
  public $first_name='John';
  public $last_name='Smith';

  public function __toString()
  {
    return "User [first='$this->first_name', last='$this->last_name']";
  }
}
 $user=new User;
 print '<span>'.$user.'</span>';

but I'm unable to find documentation about how to make this work when the object is converted to an interger... I'll update if I do

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No, not typecasting. There's a special property of Objects that allows them to return a value that makes sense when they are used in this way. If you just typecast an Object without this special override, it will either return an error or a result that's unhelpful (like: (string)$Obj == Object(5) or something). –  rockerest May 27 '11 at 21:13
    
hmmm type juggling is the closest thing I can think of to what your asking about as far as the internal conversion goes, let me see what I can figure out about the special operation –  Trey May 27 '11 at 21:18
    
thanks for your help. It looks like you were right about casting. I could have sworn there was a way without manually casting it to (string) :) I'm going to give @webbiedave the answer, but you were certainly helpful, and I appreciate the time spent! edit: I imagine integer casting would just be parseInt((string)$Obj);. On the other hand, php is loosely typed, so if __toString is returning even a "kind-of" number it would probably work without the explicit parse :) –  rockerest May 27 '11 at 21:33
    
+1 –––––––––––– –  webbiedave May 27 '11 at 21:36

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