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I post my understanding of C# lock as follows, please help me validate whether or not I get it right.

public class TestLock
{
    private object threadLock = new object();
    ...
    public void PrintOne()
    {
        lock (threadLock)
        {
            // SectionOne
        }
    }

    public void PrintTwo()
    {
        lock (threadLock)
        {
            // SectionTwo
        }
    }
    ...
}

Case I> Thread1 and Thread2 simultaneously try to call PrintOne. Since PrintOne is guarded by the instance lock, at any time, only one thread can exclusively enter the SectionOne.

Is this correct?

Case II> Thread1 and Thread2 simultaneously try to call PrintOne and PrintTwo respectively (i.e. Thread1 calls PrintOne and Thread2 calls PrintTwo) Since two print methods are guarded by the same instance lock, at any time, only one thread can exclusively access either SectionOne or SectionTwo, but NOT both.

Is this correct?

share|improve this question
1  
To summarize the answers below: the code is thread-safe per instance only. When instances share resources, @oleski has the right answer (= No) – Henk Holterman May 27 '11 at 22:15
    
And therefore -1 for not including the shared data/resource. Please edit. – Henk Holterman May 27 '11 at 22:21
2  
It's a valid point, but the original question does not say whether or not the instances are separate and, so, from the way the code/question is written it was safe to assume he was talking about the calls being made against the same instance. So, I disagree with your downvote, but that's your perogative. – Drew Marsh May 27 '11 at 22:43
    
You don't need to put tags in the title.. that's what tags are for! – drudge May 27 '11 at 23:15

1 and 2 are true only if all your threads use the same instance of the class. If they use different instances, then both cases are false

Sample

public class TestLock
{
    private  object threadLock = new object();

    public void PrintOne()
    {
        lock (threadLock)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("One");
            var f = File.OpenWrite(@"C:\temp\file.txt"); //same static resource
            f.Close();
        }
    }

    public void PrintTwo()
    {
        lock (threadLock)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Two");
            var f = File.OpenWrite(@"C:\temp\file.txt"); //same static resource
            f.Close();
        }
    }
}

And testing code

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int caseNumber = 100;

    var threads = new Thread[caseNumber];
    for (int i = 0; i < caseNumber; i++)
    {
        var t = new Thread(() =>
                                {
                                    //create new instance
                                    var testLock = new TestLock();
                                    //for this instance we safe
                                    testLock.PrintOne();
                                    testLock.PrintTwo();
                                });
        t.Start();
        //once created more than one thread, we are unsafe
    }
}

One of the possible solutions is to add a static keyword to the locking object declaration and methods that use it.

private  static object threadLock = new object();

UPDATE Good point made by konrad.kruczynski

..."thread safety" is also assumed from context. For example, I could take your file opening code and also generate exception with static lock - just taking another application domain. And therefore propose that OP should use system-wide Mutex class or sth like that. Therefore static case is just inferred as the instance one.

share|improve this answer
    
The code is thread-safe per instance. The OP mentions "instance lock" once but is vague about what is actually shared. – Henk Holterman May 27 '11 at 22:14
    
@Henk I agree, he mentioned instance lock, will update my answer. tnx. – oleksii May 27 '11 at 22:18
3  
lock performance is very directly related to how much contention there is for the lock. So you really shouldn't use a static lock unless you are modifying static data and if you are using a static lock you shouldn't use it except for protecting static data. – Yaur May 27 '11 at 22:39
    
@Yaur In my sample I modify the file. It is only one file in the system. There cannot be more than one file in a system with the same name, therefore in this case I regard my file as a static resource. And I modify it by opening it for write. Pls test my code and see it yourself. – oleksii May 27 '11 at 22:48
1  
@oleksii, there's nothing technically wrong with your example. It highlights the problem of using an instance lock when sharing a resource across instances. However, if this were a real-world example, you'd want to make the lock and the two print methods static. – Matt Davis May 28 '11 at 0:25

Yes and yes. Cases are correct.

share|improve this answer
    
code is thread unsafe – oleksii May 27 '11 at 21:54
    
@oleksii: just as you said, only per instance safe. However OP written about instance lock. – konrad.kruczynski May 27 '11 at 22:25
    
I guess @Henk makes sense, the question was vague on this particular issue – oleksii May 27 '11 at 22:34
1  
@oleksii: yeah, but taking "thread safety" is also assumed from context. For example, I could take your file opening code and also generate exception with static lock - just taking another application domain. And therefore propose that OP should use system-wide Mutex class or sth like that. Therefore static case is just inferred as the instance one. I think not reason for downvoting. – konrad.kruczynski May 27 '11 at 23:55
    
Good point, totally agree – oleksii May 28 '11 at 0:02

Your understanding is 100% correct. So if, for instance, you wanted to allow entry into the two methods separately you would want to have two locks.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for "to allow entry into the two methods separately you would want to have two locks" – Teoman Soygul May 27 '11 at 23:09

Case I: Check ✓

Case II: Check ✓

Don't forget that locking is only one way of thread synchronization. For other userfull methods, read: Thread Synchronization

Straight from MSDN sample:

public class TestThreading
{
    private System.Object lockThis = new System.Object();

    public void Process()
    {    
        lock (lockThis)
        {
            // Access thread-sensitive resources.
        }
    }    
}
share|improve this answer
4  
My recommendation: albahari.com/threading – konrad.kruczynski May 27 '11 at 21:25
3  
@oleskii: If the synchronized region does not modify static resources, there's no need for a static lock. You can't have a race condition between two contexts that don't share data. – Sean U May 27 '11 at 22:24
1  
Your example does not contain any static data, much less any static data that's being modified, so there's no possibility of a race condition related to static data. All you gain by making the synchronization object static is an opportunity for deadlock. Now if the two objects share (non-static) references to a shared object, there might be problems - but a static lock won't help you in that case. That's a problem that's better solved by not letting more than one thread tinker with a non-threadsafe object in the first place. – Sean U May 27 '11 at 22:38
1  
@oleskii: True, trying to open a file that's already got an exclusive lock will result in an IOExceptioon. This is not something you can prevent by using lock statements, because the file could just as well be locked by another object, process, program, or even (in a network environment) computer. It's a problem that needs to be handled with proper exception handling, not thread synchronization. – Sean U May 27 '11 at 22:51
1  
External resources are not the same thing as static fields, and it is unwise to conflate the two. It will invite poor decisions such as, for example, using a synchronization method that only works for issues that are constrained to a single process, such as thread locks, to try and handle concurrency issues related to resources that are not constrained to a single process, such as files. – Sean U May 28 '11 at 0:15

Yes, you're correct in both counts.

share|improve this answer

here are the basics (more or less)

1) use instance locks for instance data

public class InstanceOnlyClass{
    private int callCount;
    private object lockObject = new object();

    public void CallMe()
    {
        lock(lockObject)
        {
            callCount++;
        }
     }
}

2) use static locks for static data

public class StaticOnlyClass{
    private int createdObjects;
    private static object staticLockObject = new object();

    public StaticOnlyClass()
    {
        lock(staticLockObject)
        {
            createdObjects++;
        }
    }
}

3) if you are protecting static and instance data use separate static and instance locks

public class StaticAndInstanceClass{
    private int createdObjects;

    private static object staticLockObject = new object();

    private int callCount;

    private object lockObject = new object();

    public StaticAndInstanceClass()
    {
        lock(staticLockObject)
        {
            createdObjects++;
        }
    }

    public void CallMe()
    {
        lock(lockObject)
        {
            callCount++;
        }
     }
}

based on this your code is fine if you are accessing instance data but unsafe if you are modifying static data

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