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So I'm trying to make a simple application that quizzes the user. It asks a question and the user answers 1, 2, 3, or 4. The app then takes that answer and if it is correct adds +1 to the total_score which will be displayed at the end. Everything looks sound to me, but when I run it and I get to the if (q1_valid == false) part it skips the cout and runs the goto no matter if q1_valid is true or false.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int q1_answer;
    int total_score;
    bool q1_correct;
    bool q1_valid;

    Question_1:
    cout << "Question 1 (#3 is correct)" << endl;
    cout << "1.) Answer 1" <<endl;
    cout << "2.) Answer 2" <<endl;
    cout << "3.) Answer 3" <<endl;
    cout << "4.) Answer 4" <<endl;
    cin >> q1_answer;

    if (q1_answer == 1)
    q1_correct = false;
    q1_valid = true;

    if (q1_answer == 2)
    q1_correct = false;
    q1_valid = true;

    if (q1_answer == 3)
    q1_correct = true;
    q1_valid = true;

    if (q1_answer == 4)
    q1_correct = false;
    q1_valid = true;

    if (q1_valid == false)
    cout << "Invalid answer." <<endl;
    goto Question_1;

    if (q1_correct == true)
    cout << "Correct!" <<endl;
    (total_score + 1);
    goto Question_2;

    if (q1_correct == false)
    cout << "Incorrect." <<endl;
    goto Question_2;

    if (q1_valid == false)
    goto Question_1;

    Question_2:
    cout<< "Q2" <<endl;
cin.ignore();
cin.ignore();
}
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2  
A hint for next time: backticks are for in-line code quotes. For block-quoting code, either indent four spaces or press the {} button. –  Robᵩ May 27 '11 at 21:34
7  
How long have you been using C++? You need to wrap your if statements in curly braces. –  Rafe Kettler May 27 '11 at 21:34
    
Is that the actual code? Cause your if's seem to have many statements, but only one is actually related to the if, as you don't use { } –  George Kastrinis May 27 '11 at 21:35
    
@Rafe Kettler: That is not correct like this. An if-statement does not need to be braced, nor does the "if-body". –  phresnel Sep 14 '11 at 5:11
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I have a few tips here:

  1. If... then is a conditional, not a loop. Sorry, that's just me being slightly picky. ;)
  2. Never, ever, ever, ever use goto. ADVANCED USAGE: only use goto when there's a damned good reason to.
  3. When testing boolean values, you don't need "== true" or "== false".
  4. It looks like you haven't learned how to use the else statement yet. That's going to make your program a lot easier to read, debug, and understand.
  5. Brackets are also necessary, as noted above.
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2  
6. Variables are undefined. Unless C++ defaults boolean values to 'false', this could cause problems for his code. –  CanSpice May 27 '11 at 21:38
    
That's an excellent point. I don't want to pick on someone who's obviously a student (we were all there once!) so I tried to stop before I really got on a roll. –  Steve Howard May 27 '11 at 21:52
    
@CanSpice But I defined the boolean variable as it came up, shouldn't that accomplish the same thing? (Although it would add more useless lines of code.) –  h3half May 27 '11 at 21:59
2  
@h3half, You can declare and define variables in the same line (try bool q1_correct = false), and it's a pretty good practice to try to give them a default value. That way if you rearrange things there's no code path in which the value is undefined. –  Steve Howard May 27 '11 at 22:20
    
@h3half: What happens if q1_answer is 5? None of your booleans get defined then. –  CanSpice May 27 '11 at 22:54
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You need to use brackets:

if (q1_valid == false) {
  cout << "Invalid answer." <<endl;
  goto Question_1;
}

If you don't use the brackets, the if only executes the first statement directly following it, if the if condition evaluates to true.

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2  
I'd say the first statement, not the first line. –  user405725 May 27 '11 at 21:38
    
@Vlad: Good point, fixed. –  CanSpice May 27 '11 at 22:53
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You don't have braces around the statements after the if, so only the first statement is conditional. In this case, that means that "q1_valid=true;" runs no matter what the answer is.

if (q1_answer == 4) {
 q1_correct = false;
 q1_valid = true;
}

You need an editor which shows you this by indentions.

emacs will, for example

share|improve this answer
    
or perhaps vim ;-) –  Fredrik Pihl May 27 '11 at 21:40
    
@Fredrik: First rule of emacs is C-x M-c M-butterfly. Second rule of emacs is don't talk about vim. –  Seth Robertson May 27 '11 at 21:43
    
karakas-online.de/myLinuxTips/images/viman.png but I do like a good reference to xkcd! –  Fredrik Pihl May 27 '11 at 21:44
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Brackets for the if statement are required.

Have you considered using the switch statement:

switch (q1_answer){
  case 1:
    q1_correct = false;
    q1_valid = true;
    break;
  case 2:
    q1_correct = false;
    q1_valid = true;
    break;
  case n:
    //...
    break;
}
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3  
The switch case is clearly better than the way the if statement is used in @h3half's code, but it should be noted that neither is really good (better compare just once with a variable that indicates the correct answer, and if it's not the correct then check just once if the given answer is in the range of valid answers). –  leftaroundabout May 27 '11 at 21:46
    
@leftaroundabout This was only a suggestion for the code in question. This didn't improve the logic of it. –  Secko May 27 '11 at 21:49
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Don not forget to use brackets.

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