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I added a 50mb file or so and did a git commit.

I starting doing a :

git push origin master

But mid-way I cancelled the operation.

  1. how can I remove this file from the repo even though I did a git commit (I added it to .gitignore now but its sort of late)
  2. how can I see if the file is in the master or not?

I don't want to wipe the entire commit as there are other files I want commited (and not lost).

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Good that you cancelled it.

Remove the giant file.

git add -A
git commit --amend -C head
git push origin yourbranch

You should be fine.

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There's another very similar question here that describes a number of options:

Git: Remove file accidentally added to the repository

The simplest solution would git's filter-branch command.

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filter branch is way too heavy for what he's trying to do. –  Adam Dymitruk May 28 '11 at 0:29

Step one DO NOT PUSH If you have pushed, report back after doing something drastic.

Decision: Has this been the last commit you made?

Step two--lastcommit: git commit --amend

Step two--oldercommit: read and follow the man git-rebase page for the bit about splitting commits

Step three: read and follow the man git-filter-branch page for the bit about how to compress your .git directory. Not critical and it will happen automatically eventually.

Step four: Make a clone from you current repo to double-check that the large file is not sticking around. Verify by repo size and the absence of the file.

Step five: Push

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no yelling, please. –  Adam Dymitruk May 28 '11 at 0:29
    
@adymitruk: Seriously? –  Seth Robertson May 28 '11 at 0:35
    
I was kidding. But I did forget to undo the down vote. Corrected now. –  Adam Dymitruk May 28 '11 at 7:02
    
The push did not complete. You don't need all those steps. –  Adam Dymitruk May 28 '11 at 7:05

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