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http://codepad.org/zmsXbqhu

I have very simple code (viewable above):

<?php
$js = json_encode( "HO" );
var_dump( $js );
?>

It returns a string with extra quotes around it:

string(4) ""HO""

Any idea why that is?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In JSON...

A string is a sequence of zero or more Unicode characters, wrapped in double quotes, using backslash escapes.

source

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So how can I remove the additional quotes? –  Shamoon May 28 '11 at 0:48
1  
You don't. If you do, it won't be JSON. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 28 '11 at 0:49
    
Which quotes are you concerned with. Trying wrapping them with ** ** in your post so they are bolded. I'm confused now! –  Layke May 28 '11 at 0:55
    
By double quotes the documentation describes the following symbol: " (in the opposition to single quote: '), not two consecutive symbols like outputted by the var_dump() function. @Shamoon you really do not have any additional quotes (see my answer). –  Tadeck May 28 '11 at 1:03

Because you are var_dump'ing. It wraps it in the quotes. If you don't var_dump and echo you will see the actual string.

Here, take a look at this:

http://codepad.viper-7.com/KB5Fkk

Code

 <?php

$js = json_encode( '{ book : "how to use json", author: "some clever guy" }' );
var_dump( $js );

echo "<br /> The actual string:<br />";
echo $js;
?>

Output:

string(61) ""{ book : \"how to use json\", author: \"some clever guy\" }"" 
The actual string:
"{ book : \"how to use json\", author: \"some clever guy\" }"
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1  
Why would I not be surprised if this was the actual issue... –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 28 '11 at 0:51
    
I know. lol. :) It's only because he used "extra quotes" in his question. Meaning that he acknowledges the existance of the "first" set of quotes.. at least that is what you can infer from that. –  Layke May 28 '11 at 0:52

If you do it like that:

$json = json_encode("HO");
echo $json;

it will return the following:

"HO"

The reason your code returns something like that:

string(4) ""HO""

is that you used var_dump(), which can not be treaten as echo's replacement (see var_dump() documentation).

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Because the JSON representation for a string is enclosed in quotes. You encoded a string, and that's how it's represented in JSON.

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