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I'm using loops to create a grid of movie clips. The clips are stored in an array tileArray.
Here is my code:

//Spawn Checkers
var i:int = new int();
var j:int = new int();
var tileArray:Array = new Array();
for (i=0; i<22; i++)
{
    for (j=0; j<12; j++)
    {
        var tile:checker = new checker(i * 25 + 49,j * 25 + 40);
        stage.addChild(tile);
        tileArray.push(tile);
    }
}
//Activate Checkers (TEST)
var m:int = new int();
for (m=0; m<tileArray.length; m++)
{
    tileArray[m].gotoAndPlay(1);
}

My problem is when the //Activate Checkers (TEST) code section is run it doesn't address the 0th element. Namely the first tile created at position (49,40). If I do tileArray[0].gotoAndPlay(1); it works, but for some reason the for loop will hit every tile but the first checker object in tileArray.

e: When using trace(m); I can see that m does indeed start at 0, but the loop fails to execute tileArray[0].gotoAndPlay(1). Additionally, if I put tileArray[0].gotoAndPlay(1); outside of the loop and comment out the loop none of the tiles animate. tileArray[0].gotoAndPlay(1); doesn't work outside the loop, but does work inside - except when the array index is my iterative variable. Very strange.

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3  
new int() and new Array()?? Just var i:int and var tileArray:Array = [], it's shorter and faster. –  alxx May 28 '11 at 6:01
    
@alxx,declaration of i and j isn't needed at all. But if you declare var i:int = 0 before for all will be a bit more faster –  Eugeny89 May 28 '11 at 8:37
    
what is in your checker class ? I am assuming that you are passing the x,y location -- but i can't see what happens in that class, and that might be part of the issue. Also does the checker class involve a library movieclip ? if so, does that movieclip have any code on it's timeline ? I used your code with my own checker symbol from the library and this code worked. So I believe the issue lies within the checker class or with the symbol being used from the library. My only change was to manually set the x,y position of the tile with your calculations after creating the instance in the loop. –  prototypical May 29 '11 at 0:40

2 Answers 2

You could simplify your code a bit, and it may fix the problem:

//avoid the use of the **new** statement (it initialise a bunch of stuff you dont need)
var i:int; 
var j:int;
var tileArray:Array = [];

for (i=0; i<22; i++)
{
    for (j=0; j<12; j++)
    {
        //** updated ** I forgot to add the [i] for index position
        tileArray[i] = new checker(i * 25 + 49,j * 25 + 40);
        addChild(tileArray[i]);
    }
}

//Activate Checkers (TEST)
var m:int;

for (m=0; m<tileArray.length; m++)
{
    tileArray[m].gotoAndPlay(1);
}
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2  
I would use Vector.<MovieClip> instead of Array. –  roberkules May 28 '11 at 10:39
2  
tileArray = ..., you mean tileArray.push? Also storing the tileArray.length in a local var is faster than using it directly in the for loop. How about using a for each loop? –  Will Kru May 28 '11 at 10:51
    
@roberkules Vector uses Arrays internally! The main advantage on using Vectors is that they automatic increase in capacity, while arrays have a fixed size. In this case, there a small fix number of elements and choosing to use array over vector makes more sense as arrays have faster access (they are primitives functions) and least amount of memory usage. –  nelsond8 May 28 '11 at 10:54
    
@Will Kru You are right also, I forget to add [i] to my array object. I updated the code, now it make more sense. About using a var instead of tileArray.lengt, Im not sure if it would improve anything, but you may be right. –  nelsond8 May 28 '11 at 11:04
1  
@nelsond8 your comment "The main advantage on using Vectors is that they automatic increase in capacity, while arrays have a fixed size." is not correct. Arrays in ActionScript are not fixed size; if they were, they wouldn't have a push() method. What you described is the difference between Arrays and Vectors in a language like C++. –  jhocking May 28 '11 at 11:52

When I need to loop through an entire array, I generally use the for/each syntax:

for each (var tile:checker in tileArray) {
  tile.gotoAndPlay(1);
}

That doesn't explain the weird behavior you are encountering (I have no clue, I would start looking at the "checker" class but that's flailing) but it may make it irrelevant.

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The checker class extends movie clip and is literally just a constructor that takes two arguments and uses them as coordinates; I really doubt the checker class is the problem. –  warpstack May 29 '11 at 1:33

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