Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

For example if we have these set of coordinates

"latitude": 48.858844300000001,
"longitude": 2.2943506,

How can we find out the city/country?

share|improve this question
1  
You'll probably need a database of some sort. I'd try playing with the Google Maps API myself... it supports lat/long. –  tjameson May 28 '11 at 1:19
1  
See also Get country from latitude longitude –  hippietrail Jul 31 '12 at 12:35

6 Answers 6

up vote 27 down vote accepted

The free Google Geocoding API provides this service via a HTTP REST API. Note, the API is usage and rate limited, but you can pay for unlimited access.

Try this link to see an example of the output (this is in json, output is also available in XML)

http://maps.googleapis.com/maps/api/geocode/json?latlng=40.714224,-73.961452&sensor=true

share|improve this answer
    
accepting this because this is the one i end up going for :) Michael's answer is certainly a great option tho! –  ming yeow Jun 16 '11 at 6:30
3  
Google's reverse geocoding is only allowed in conjunction with a Google Map. If you want a solution that has no such restrictions (though it is commercial and only has US cities), check out: askgeo.com –  James D May 8 '12 at 22:11
    
mapquest api is another option here as it has no rate limits in some cases and very high rate limits for various geocoding needs. –  Tom Aug 2 '14 at 16:07

Another option:

  • Download the cities database from http://download.geonames.org/export/dump/
  • Add each city as a lat/long -> City mapping to a spatial index such as an R-Tree (some DBs also have the functionality)
  • Use nearest-neighbour search to find the closest city for any given point

Advantages:

  • Does not depend on an external server to be available
  • Very fast (easily does thousands of lookups per second)

Disadvantages:

  • Not automatically up to date
  • Requires extra code if you want to distinguish the case where the nearest city is dozens of miles away
  • May give weird results near the poles and the international date line (though there aren't any cities in those places anyway
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for a great source of free data. –  Kevin Jun 15 '11 at 9:27
    
thanks! this is a great tip –  ming yeow Jun 16 '11 at 6:30
    
EXCELLENT ! ! ! THANKS A LOT ! ! –  Vivek Sampara Apr 27 '12 at 23:29
2  
Will also give weird results for cities within cities, for example certain locations in Rome may return "Vatican City" - depending on the lat/lon specified in the database for each. –  Noel Abrahams Jun 27 '12 at 17:56
    
holy cheesus, GREAT DATA SOURCE! –  Shocklo Jul 15 at 18:40

I was searching for a similar functionality and I saw the data "http://download.geonames.org/export/dump/" shared on earlier reply (thank you for sharing, it is an excellent source), and implemented a service based on the cities1000.txt data.

You can see it running at http://scatter-otl.rhcloud.com/location?lat=36&long=-78.9 Just change the latitude and longitude for your locations.

It is deployed on OpenShift (RedHat Platform). First call after a long idle period may take sometime, but usually performance is satisfactory. Feel free to use this service as you like...

Also, you can find the project source at https://github.com/turgos/Location.

share|improve this answer

It really depends on what technology restrictions you have.

One way is to have a spatial database with the outline of the countries and cities you are interested in. By outline I mean that countries and cities are store as the spatial type polygon. Your set of coordinates can be converted to the spatial type point and queried against the polygons to get the country/city name where the point is located.

Here are some of the databases which support spatial type: SQL server 2008, MySQL, postGIS - an extension of postgreSQL and Oracle.

If you would like to use a service in stead of having your own database for this you can use Yahoo's GeoPlanet. For the service approach you might want to check out this answer on gis.stackexchange.com, which covers the availability of services for solving your problem.

share|improve this answer

I spent about an 30min trying to find a code example of how to do this in Javascript. I couldn't find a quick clear answer to the question you posted. So... I made my own. Hopefully people can use this without having to go digging into the API or staring at code they have no idea how to read. Ha if nothing else I can reference this post for my own stuff.. Nice question and thanks for the forum of discussion!

This is utilizing the Google API.

<script src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.9.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://maps.googleapis.com/maps/api/js?key=<YOURGOOGLEKEY>&sensor=false&v=3&libraries=geometry"></script>

.

//CHECK IF BROWSER HAS HTML5 GEO LOCATION
if (navigator.geolocation) {
    navigator.geolocation.getCurrentPosition(function (position) {

        //GET USER CURRENT LOCATION
        var locCurrent = new google.maps.LatLng(position.coords.latitude, position.coords.longitude);

        //CHECK IF THE USERS GEOLOCATION IS IN AUSTRALIA
        var geocoder = new google.maps.Geocoder();
            geocoder.geocode({ 'latLng': locCurrent }, function (results, status) {
                var locItemCount = results.length;
                var locCountryNameCount = locItemCount - 1;
                var locCountryName = results[locCountryNameCount].formatted_address;

                if (locCountryName == "Australia") {
                    //SET COOKIE FOR GIVING
                    jQuery.cookie('locCountry', locCountryName, { expires: 30, path: '/' }); 
                }
        });
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Please check the below answer. It works for me

if(navigator.geolocation) {
    navigator.geolocation.getCurrentPosition(function(position){

        initialize(position.coords.latitude,position.coords.longitude);
    }); 
}

function initialize(lat,lng) {
    //directionsDisplay = new google.maps.DirectionsRenderer(rendererOptions);
    //directionsService = new google.maps.DirectionsService();
    var latlng = new google.maps.LatLng(lat, lng);

    //alert(latlng);
    getLocation(latlng);
}

function getLocation(latlng){

    var geocoder = new google.maps.Geocoder();
    geocoder.geocode({'latLng': latlng}, function(results, status) {
            if (status == google.maps.GeocoderStatus.OK) {
                if (results[0]) {
                    var loc = getCountry(results);
                    alert("location is::"+loc);
                }
            }
        });

}

function getCountry(results)
{
    for (var i = 0; i < results[0].address_components.length; i++)
    {
        var shortname = results[0].address_components[i].short_name;
        var longname = results[0].address_components[i].long_name;
        var type = results[0].address_components[i].types;
        if (type.indexOf("country") != -1)
        {
            if (!isNullOrWhitespace(shortname))
            {
                return shortname;
            }
            else
            {
                return longname;
            }
        }
    }

}

function isNullOrWhitespace(text) {
    if (text == null) {
        return true;
    }
    return text.replace(/\s/gi, '').length < 1;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.