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I am using the Google App Engine testbed framework to write test cases with mock objects. This is documented here. I've got my datastore tests working nicely using the mock database (Testbed.init_datastore_v3_stub), and this lets my test cases run over a fast, fresh database which is re-initialised for each test case. Now I want to test functionality that depends on the current user.

There is another testbed service called Testbed.init_user_stub, which I can activate to get the "fake" user service. Unfortunately, there doesn't seem to be any documentation for this one. I am activating and using it like this:

import unittest
from google.appengine.ext import testbed
from google.appengine.api import users

class MyTest(unittest.TestCase):
    def setUp(self):
        self.testbed = testbed.Testbed()
        self.testbed.activate()
        self.testbed.init_user_stub()

    def testUser(self):
        u = users.get_current_user()
        self.assertNotEqual(u, None)

The problem is that I haven't found any way to tell the "fake" user service to authenticate a "fake" user. So running that test, I (predictably) get

AssertionError: None == None

meaning the fake user service is telling my app that the current user is not logged in. How can I tell the fake user service to pretend that a user is logged in? Ideally, I'd like to be able to specify the fake user's nickname, email, user_id and whether or not they are an admin. It seems like this would be quite a common thing to want (since you need to test how the app behaves when a) nobody is logged in, b) a user is logged in, and c) an admin is logged in), but googling "init_user_stub" returns almost nothing.

Note: If you want to test the above program, you need to add this to the top:

import sys
sys.path.append('/PATH/TO/APPENGINE/SDK')
import dev_appserver
dev_appserver.fix_sys_path()

and this to the bottom:

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

In addition to tschundeee's answer:

The actual check in google.appengine.api.users looks like this:

def is_current_user_admin():
    return (os.environ.get('USER_IS_ADMIN', '0')) == '1'

The key is thus to set the environment variable USER_IS_ADMIN to '1'. This can be done in multiple ways, but do note that you're modifying a global variable and thus this might affect other code. The key is to do a proper cleanup.

One could use the Mock library to patch os.environ, use Testbed or roll their own creative way. I prefer to use Testbed as it hints that the hack is appengine related. Mock is not included in Python versions before 3.3 so this adds an extra test dependency.

Extra note: When using the unittest module I prefer to use addCleanup instead of tearDown since cleanups are also called when setUp fails.

Example test:

import unittest

from google.appengine.api import users
from google.appengine.ext import testbed


class AdminTest(unittest.TestCase):
    def setUp(self):
        tb = testbed.Testbed()
        tb.activate()
        # ``setup_env`` takes care of the casing ;-)
        tb.setup_env(user_is_admin='1')
        self.addCleanup(tb.deactivate)

    def test_is_current_user_admin(self):
        self.assertTrue(users.is_current_user_admin())

Note: Testbed.setup_env should be called after Testbed.activate. Testbed takes a snapshot of os.environ upon activation, that snapshot is restored upon deactivation. If Testbed.setup_env is called before activation the real os.environ is modified instead of the temporary instance, thus effectively polluting the environment.

This behaves as it should:

>>> import os
>>> from google.appengine.ext import testbed
>>> 
>>> tb = testbed.Testbed()
>>> tb.activate()
>>> tb.setup_env(user_is_admin='1')
>>> assert 'USER_IS_ADMIN' in os.environ
>>> tb.deactivate()
>>> assert 'USER_IS_ADMIN' not in os.environ
>>> 

This pollutes the environment:

>>> import os
>>> from google.appengine.ext import testbed
>>> 
>>> tb = testbed.Testbed()
>>> tb.setup_env(user_is_admin='1')
>>> tb.activate()
>>> assert 'USER_IS_ADMIN' in os.environ
>>> tb.deactivate()
>>> assert 'USER_IS_ADMIN' not in os.environ
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AssertionError
share|improve this answer

Here is what worked for me to simulate a logged in user:

self.testbed.setup_env(USER_EMAIL='usermail@gmail.com',USER_ID='1', USER_IS_ADMIN='0')
self.testbed.init_user_stub()
share|improve this answer
    
that works, but it seems testbed.setup_env() has to go before testbed.activate(), otherwise it has no effect. –  gargc May 27 '13 at 20:07
    
@gargc I'm sorry to say that what you've stated is wrong and potentially 'dangerous'. Please see my answer for a demonstration. –  siebz0r Jan 15 at 14:20
    
@siebz0r Good call ! By the way, I've just found out why I had to change the order of the calls to make it work. USER_EMAIL and USER_ID are set to an empty string upon activation as part of the default environment (that does not happen with user_is_admin). The solution is to pass overwrite=True to setup_env, otherwise any variables already in the environment are ignored resulting in get_current_user() being always None. –  gargc Jan 21 at 9:53
up vote 13 down vote accepted

Well I don't think there is an official way to do it, but I have been reading the source code and I found a "hack" way to do it that is working well so far. (Normally I'd be worried about using undocumented behaviour, but it's a test suite so it only matters if it works on the dev server.)

The dev server figures out the currently logged-in user based on three environment variables:

  • USER_EMAIL: The user's email address, and the user's nickname.
  • USER_ID: The user's unique Google ID (string).
  • USER_IS_ADMIN: "0" if the user is non-admin, "1" if the user is an admin.

You can use os.environ to set these as you would any other environment variable, and they take immediate effect (obviously this won't work on the production server). But you can use them with testbed's user_stub and they will be reset when you deactivate the testbed (which you should do on tearDown, so you get a fresh environment for each test case).

Since setting environment variables is a bit unwieldy, I wrote some wrapper functions to package them up:

import os

def setCurrentUser(email, user_id, is_admin=False):
    os.environ['USER_EMAIL'] = email or ''
    os.environ['USER_ID'] = user_id or ''
    os.environ['USER_IS_ADMIN'] = '1' if is_admin else '0'

def logoutCurrentUser():
    setCurrentUser(None, None)
share|improve this answer
10  
this is basically the right idea. except that you want to use testbed.setup_env() instead of os.environ directly. –  ryan Jul 26 '11 at 15:27
    
I'm downvoting this because this is polluting the environment. It should be noted that a cleanup is required. This can be done using testbed as @ryan stated. –  siebz0r Jan 15 at 13:38

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