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How can I find the method that called the current method?

I have a method in an object that is called from a number of places within the object. Is there a quick and easy way to get the name of the method that called this popular method.

Pseudo Code EXAMPLE:

public Main()
{
     PopularMethod();
}

public ButtonClick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
     PopularMethod();
}

public Button2Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
     PopularMethod();
}

public void PopularMethod()
{
     //Get calling method name
}

Within PopularMethod() I would like to see the value of "Main" if it was called from Main ... I'd like to see "ButtonClick" if PopularMethod() was called from ButtonClick

I was looking at the System.Reflection.MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod() but that won't get me the calling method. I've looked at the StackTrace class but I really didn't relish running an entire stack trace every time that method is called.

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Conrad Frix, itsme86, Julius, Sébastien Le Callonnec Jan 30 '13 at 23:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

7 Answers 7

up vote 46 down vote accepted

I don't think it can be done without tracing the stack. However, it's fairly simple to do that:

StackTrace stackTrace = new StackTrace();
MethodBase methodBase = stackTrace.GetFrame(1).GetMethod();
Console.WriteLine(methodBase.Name); // e.g.

However, I think you really have to stop and ask yourself if this is necessary.

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For more info see: discuss.joelonsoftware.com/default.asp?dotnet.12.511358.10 –  Eric Lathrop Mar 5 '09 at 18:35
2  
System.Diagnostics is the namespace of StackTrace, System.Reflection is the namespace of MethodBase. –  Guvante Mar 5 '09 at 18:35
    
Jason - Thank you, I'm not sure how resource intensive the "StackTrace" method is, but this does get me what I'm looking for. This is just a debugging code block for me, this won't be going into production. Thank you again for your help ! –  Scott Vercuski Mar 5 '09 at 18:35
1  
@Scott Vercuski - It's an immensly expensive operation, if there's any way you can avoid this you really should. It way worse than throwing exceptions and that's bad. It's nice that it can be done, but it should not be misused. –  John Leidegren Mar 6 '09 at 5:47
1  
@John Leidegren - Definitely ... this isn't going into production code, we're just doing some massive QA testing and getting some strange happenings, this is just to help figure out where things are going haywire. Thank you ! –  Scott Vercuski Mar 6 '09 at 12:14

In .NET 4.5 / C# 5, this is simple:

public void PopularMethod([CallerMemberName] string caller = null)
{
     // look at caller
}

The compiler adds the caller's name automatically; so:

void Foo() {
    PopularMethod();
}

will pass in "Foo".

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excellent solution !! can't wait until we convert to 4.5 here (it'll be a while) but I will definitely keep this in mind ! thank you! –  Scott Vercuski Jan 2 '13 at 13:51
    
What are the performance consequences of this solution? –  Feckmore Jan 16 '13 at 19:12
1  
@Feckmore none whatsoever : the compiler adds it as a literal during compilation. It will be signifantly faster than anything like looking at StackTrace etc. basically it gets compiled as PopularMethod("CurrentMethodName") –  Marc Gravell Jan 16 '13 at 20:27
    
I get an error saying Cannot find CallerMemberName. VS Express C# 2010 –  john ktejik Feb 21 '14 at 3:04
    
@user396483 you need to be targeting .NET 4.5 or above for the attribute to exist (although you can define it yourself), and you need to be using C# 5 for it to work in the way desired. VS Express 2013 is available and free –  Marc Gravell Feb 21 '14 at 8:48

This is actually really simple.

public void PopularMethod()
{
    var currentMethod = System.Reflection.MethodInfo
        .GetCurrentMethod(); // as MethodBase
}

But be careful through, I'm a bit skeptical to if inlining the method has any effect. You can do this to make sure that the JIT compiler won't get in the way.

[System.Runtime.CompilerServices.MethodImpl(
 System.Runtime.CompilerServices.MethodImplOptions.NoInlining)]
public void PopularMethod()
{
    var currentMethod = System.Reflection.MethodInfo
        .GetCurrentMethod();
}

To get the calling method:

[System.Runtime.CompilerServices.MethodImpl(
 System.Runtime.CompilerServices.MethodImplOptions.NoInlining)]
public void PopularMethod()
{
    // 1 == skip frames, false = no file info
    var callingMethod = new System.Diagnostics.StackTrace(1, false)
         .GetFrame(0).GetMethod();
}
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2  
John Leidgren - That will get me the name "PopularMethod", but I want the name of the method that called PopularMethod. –  Scott Vercuski Mar 5 '09 at 18:30
1  
Right, well the stack trace is what you need then. I misread your question. –  John Leidegren Mar 5 '09 at 18:33
    
The just use .GetFrame(1) instead, right? –  Andrew Backer Feb 17 '10 at 23:35
1  
+1 for the MethodInlining.NoInlining. BTW the false on the StackTrace .ctor invocation is redundant, isnt it? –  Ruben Bartelink Oct 15 '10 at 11:31
1  
I believe it did exhibit slightly better preformance if I didn't ask for the file information explicitly. Truth be told, it probably doesn't matter, the main reason why I did it like that, was because I didn't need the file information. –  John Leidegren Oct 15 '10 at 12:08

Just pass in a parameter

public void PopularMethod(object sender)
{

}

IMO: If it's good enough for events it should be good enough for this.

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Sruly - Yes that is definitely an option, I was trying to do it without altering the method call. This would be my last resort option. –  Scott Vercuski Mar 5 '09 at 18:32
    
Unless you are exposing this as a public API, why would you go through a hassle and use reflection if you can just do it this way? REmember KISS –  Sruly Mar 5 '09 at 18:38
    
This is the BEST answer, do not use reflection or other stuff, ID the caller via a parameter. –  Allen Rice Mar 5 '09 at 18:52
    
If you're looking for something like namespace/assembly info, passing a Type can be a better choice since the call may come from a static method. –  Chris Moschini Jan 24 '13 at 1:05
    
I've written code for many systems. Often developers want to track the method which is writing a log entry. The if the logging code requires manually passing the method name, this requires developer to enter the method name as text every time it calls the logging method. Now use this same logging method in many different parts of the program, and see what happens as methods are added, deleted, and renamed with many developers over a few years. Automating the passing of the caller's method name will greatly ease development and debugging. –  Zarepheth Dec 12 '13 at 23:08

I have often found my self wanting to do this, but have always ending up refactoring the design of my system so I don't get this "Tail wagging the dog" anti-pattern. The result has always been a more robust architecture.

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Is this an answer? –  Austin Henley Oct 10 '12 at 20:27

While you can most definitley trace the Stack and figure it out that way, I would urge you to rethink your design. If your method needs to know about some sort of "state", I would say just create an enum or something, and take that as a Parameter to your PopularMethod(). Something along those lines. Based on what you're posting, tracing the stack would be overkill IMO.

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I think you do need to use the StackTrace class and then StackFrame.GetMethod() on the next frame.

This seems like a strange thing to use reflection for though. If you are defining PopularMethod, can't go define a parameter or something to pass the information you really want. (Or put in on a base class or something...)

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