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I accidentally noticed that two of my models have some resemblance. Their names are GameItem and OwnedItem. A GameItem is a just an item of the game, while an OwnedItem represents if a player has that item, if it's on his/her inventory or warehouse and more. My models are now like ( i removed validations and some irrelevant code for simplicity) :

class OwnedItem < ActiveRecord::Base
    belongs_to :user
    belongs_to :game_item
    belongs_to :ownable, :polymorphic => true  # [warehouse|inventory]

  scope :equipped, where(:is_equipped => 1).includes(:game_item)

  scope :item, lambda { |item_type|
    joins(:game_item).
    where("game_items.item_type = ?", item_type ).
    limit(1)
  }

  scope :inventory, where(:ownable_type => 'Inventory')
  scope :warehouse, where(:ownable_type => 'Warehouse') 
end



class GameItem < ActiveRecord::Base 

  scope :can_be_sold, where(:is_sold => 1)

  scope :item_type, lambda { |item_type|
    where("game_items.item_type = ?", item_type )
  } 

  scope :item_types, lambda { |item_types|
    where("game_items.item_type IN (?)", item_types )
  }   

  scope :class_type, lambda { |class_type|
    where("game_items.class_type = ?", class_type )
  }

  scope :grade, lambda { |grade|
    where("game_items.grade = ?", grade )
  }
end

Notice the issue with game_item.item_type. I reference it in owned_item model, thus breaking encapsulation and repeating myself. How can i actually be able to do something like :

user.inventory.owned_items.item_type('Weapon').equipped

that is, without actually adding repeated code in my OwnedItem model, but getting that information out of the GameItem model ?

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1 Answer

I think you've defined the relationships here in a way that's going to cause you trouble. You may find it's better off to use a simple user to item join model, something like this:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :owned_items
  has_many :game_items, :through => :owned_items
end

class OwnedItem < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :game_item

  # Has 'location' field: 'warehouse' or 'inventory'
end

class GameItem < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :owned_items
  has_many :users, :through => :owned_items
end

This is a common pattern where you have users and some kind of thing which they will own an instance of. The relationship table in the middle, OwnedItem, is used to establish, among other things, any unique characteristics of this particular instance of GameItem as well as the location of it relative to the user.

Generally this sort of structure avoids using polymorphic associations which can be trouble if used too casually. Whenever possible, try and avoid polymorphic associations unless they are on the very edge of your relationships. Putting them in the middle massively complicates joins and makes indexes a lot harder to tune.

As a note about the original, you can roll up a lot of that into a simple scope that uses the hash method for where:

scope :with_item_type, lambda { |types|
  where('game_items.item_type' => types)
}

This will take either an array or string argument and will use IN or = accordingly. It's actually quite handy to do it this way because you won't need to remember which one to use.

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hey tadman, thank you for the reply :) I actually have a user model with the same associations as you suggest ( i just did not include it here, but you can see the belongs_to use in my ownedItem model ). I also tried using has_many owned_items in gameItem, but still i could not do something like user.inventory.owned_items.game_items.item_type('Weapon').equipped. I also needed polymorphic associations here,, because an item can be in an inventory or a warehouse. –  Spyros May 28 '11 at 18:09
    
The scope you suggest is pretty handy indeed, your reply definitely deserves +1, but i would still have the same problem of encapsulation for the ownedItem model. I would need to create a separate scope that includes the gameItem model to check for the types :/ –  Spyros May 28 '11 at 18:11
    
Usually the reason you have two different models is the entities they represent are sufficiently different as to require it. If "inventory" is not really all that different from "warehouse" from a data perspective, why can't you combine them into a single model with a location indicator attribute? If they have minor differences, why not use STI? Polymorphic associations are usually a sign something's wrong. –  tadman May 30 '11 at 14:49
    
You definitely seem to be no fan of polymorphism is rails :) As i have it now, the game item has an ownable_type where i can see whether the item belongs to the inventory or the warehouse. And indeed some of the similar functionality exists in a model named Storable. This seems to be working fine till now, but i am definitely taking your words into account. It would be tedious to change now, but i am always a sucker for better code. –  Spyros May 30 '11 at 19:25
    
I don't mind using polymorphic if it's on the edge of your data structure, but if it's in the middle it causes trouble. For one it makes your JOIN statements twice as complicated, your indexes require compound keys, and you can't use foreign keys to ensure data integrity. They're intended to be used as a last resort, really, or as a convenience measure when the alternative is not much faster. –  tadman May 31 '11 at 13:23
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