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I have 2 lines near one another in a Perl script that could throw a __WARN__. If the first one throws, then I want to just return from the function and not try to continue.

I know how to set up a handler before both lines so I can report the error etc:

local $SIG{__WARN__} = sub {
  my $e = shift;
  # log the error etc.
  return;
};
# possibly warning-resulting line 1
# possibly warning-resulting line 2

But then this happens for both lines. I'd rather it just caught the first instance and returned from the function. But the return in that handler only returns the handler, not the outer function.

Is there a way to return from the function when handling a signal?

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1  
What kind of warnings do you expect? If you know the reason for a warning from the start, why not account for it in your sub before executing line 1 and 2? –  Dallaylaen May 28 '11 at 10:31

4 Answers 4

Wrap the two lines in separate functions, and have the first return a status indicating that the calling function should return. The separate functions can deal with the warnings as you need - possibly using the same function to do the same logging.

sub wrap_line_1
{
    local $SIG{__WARN__} = ...;
    ...do line 1...
    return ($warning_fired ? 1 : 0);
}

sub wrap_line_2
{
    local $SIG{__WARN__} = ...;
    ...do line 2...
    return;
}


...calling code...
wrap_line_1() and return;
wrap_line_2();
...
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No, you can't force the caller to return. (Well, I'm sure you can, with the right black magic XS incantation. But don't!)

This seems like a misguided design; warnings aren't supposed to be fatal errors, and certainly shouldn't be used like this.

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2  
You can even without black magic with use warnings FATAL => 'all'. With it, any warning throw and exception that can be processed accordingly. –  bvr May 28 '11 at 10:03
    
Fair enough, though I'm very hesitant to consider that a "return". More information about the structure of this program would be helpful. –  Eevee May 28 '11 at 21:08

You can die() in your handler and catch this in an eval as shown below:

use 5.12.0;

local $SIG{__WARN__} = sub {
  my $e = shift;
  # log the error etc.
  die "$e";
};

func(undef);
func('honk');

sub func {
    my $foo = shift;

    eval {
       my $bar = "a $foo";
       say "$bar";
    };
    if ($@) {
       die $@ unless $@ =~ /^Use of uninitialized value/;
    }
    return;
}

You probably, though, want to check directly if the warning could happen and simply return:

sub func {
  my $foo = shift;
  return unless defined($foo);
  ...; # use $foo fine
}
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Just throw an exception and catch and return in the caller.

Make the handler return a value and check it to return in the if statement after the eval.

Actually you don't even have to return a value from the handler because it's not deciding whether to return -- you always return when you catch.

Specifically:

# We're in the caller now
eval{
    local $SIG{__WARN__} = sub {
        my $e = shift;
        # log the error etc.
        die MyWarnException->new("This is an exception.");
    };

    # Offending statements go here
    do_things();

};
if( $@ && $@->isa('MyWarnException')){
    return;
}
share|improve this answer
    
so, do you mean, have the handler set a global flag, and then in subsequent code, check if that flag was set? –  John Bachir May 28 '11 at 7:15
    
Actually I was too hasty correcting myself: you do need to throw an exception. Let me edit the answer to show what I mean. –  trutheality May 28 '11 at 7:30

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