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I am updating a value in a sql table and then printing the value, it is still showing old value.

<?
print_r(mysql_fetch_array(mysql_query("select visits from Orders")));
mysql_query("update Orders set visits=visits+1");
print_r(mysql_fetch_array(mysql_query("select visits from Orders")));
?>

It outputs 1 and then again 1. The second value should be 2. When I check in PhpMyAdmin it is 2 then why is it showing Old Value?

Please help! Thanks in advance.

Regards, Mike

Edit:

This is the code the OP tried:

mysql_connect("localhost","mayankx_tt","111111");
mysql_select_db("mayankx_tt") or die(mysql_error()); 
print_r(mysql_fetch_array(mysql_query("select visits from Orders")));
mysql_query("update Orders set visits=visits+1");
print_r(mysql_fetch_array(mysql_query("select visits from Orders"))); 

And his output:

Array ( [0] => 4 [visits] => 4 ) Array ( [0] => 4 [visits] => 4 )
share|improve this question
1  
Hm, odd. Can you copy+paste the "print_r" outputs? –  Pekka 웃 May 28 '11 at 9:08
2  
And show the exact code you're using? –  Pekka 웃 May 28 '11 at 9:14
    
mysql_connect("localhost","mayankx_tt","111111"); mysql_select_db("mayankx_tt") or die(mysql_error()); print_r(mysql_fetch_array(mysql_query("select visits from Orders"))); mysql_query("update Orders set visits=visits+1"); print_r(mysql_fetch_array(mysql_query("select visits from Orders"))); –  Mike May 28 '11 at 9:42
    
Output: Array ( [0] => 4 [visits] => 4 ) Array ( [0] => 4 [visits] => 4 ) –  Mike May 28 '11 at 9:43

5 Answers 5

Check whether the UPDATE is actually executing:

mysql_connect("localhost","mayankx_tt","111111");
mysql_select_db("mayankx_tt") or die(mysql_error());

# Checking PRE Value
print_r(mysql_fetch_array(mysql_query("select visits from Orders")));

# Attempting to Modify
if( !mysql_query("update Orders set visits=visits+1") ){
  echo 'Error Occurred: #'.mysql_errno().' '.mysql_error();
}else{
  echo 'UPDATE Processed OK';
}

# Check POST Value
print_r(mysql_fetch_array(mysql_query("select visits from Orders")));

Run that and let us (me) know what output it produced.

share|improve this answer

Check you have write privileges to the database. Also check your query cache? Load up your db in either CLI or something like phpmyadmin / sequel pro and run the query as root. Check the results. The problem will most likely be down to permissions / caching.

share|improve this answer
    
How can I check query caching? How can I disable it? When I run the query in PHPMYADMIN it works fine. –  Mike May 28 '11 at 10:34
    
dont bother about checking oddly configured query caching then... it seems its most definitely a permissions issue. Try setting your mysql login details in the php application to use root and test that. –  AariaCarterWeir May 28 '11 at 12:17

I could be on the wrong track here, but it might be because you're updating the entire Orders table. Try adding a WHERE clause to your UPDATE and SELECT queries so that they only affect/fetch one row.

share|improve this answer
    
Jam, thanks for the reply, but there is only one order in the db. –  Mike May 28 '11 at 10:35
    
Oh my bad. Sorry I can't be of any help :-) –  Bojangles May 28 '11 at 13:25

I have encountered a similar problem, when there was no WHERE clause in the update/delete query. Newer MySQL versions won't execute the script if WHERE is missing, regardless of how many rows you have.

Phpmyadmin usually adds this WHERE clause to everything however, so it may work there, and not in PHP. For instance, if you browse a table, you'll see in Phpmyadmin the query

SELECT * FROM TABLE_NAME WHERE 1

share|improve this answer

You may be getting error due to using orders as tablename. "Orders" Is reserved keyword so in order to use it as tablename for select and update enclose it with backtick (`) symbol

"Update `Orders` set visit = visit + 1"

For executing Mysql Query better track the error too. generally we log sql statement and either log or show the error message as per setting. For simple debugging use following stmt:

mysql_query( "SQL STMT" ) or die("MYSQL Error :: ".mysql_errno()."<br>Message: ".mysql_error());
share|improve this answer
    
I agree using backticks (generally), but afaik Orders (plural) is not a reserved word to MySQL, whereas ORDER (singular) is. –  Jürgen Thelen May 28 '11 at 13:02

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