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In a swing application, I would like to re-utilize a spawned thread instead of creating a new one to serve requests. This is because the requests would be coming in short intervals of time and the cost of creating a new thread for every request could be high.

I am thinking of using the interrupt() and sleep() methods to do this as below and would like to know any potential performance problems with the code:

public class MyUtils {
    private static TabSwitcherThread tabSwitcherThread = null;

    public static void handleStateChange(){
        if(tabSwitcherThread == null || !tabSwitcherThread.isAlive()){
            tabSwitcherThread = new TabSwitcherThread();
            tabSwitcherThread.start();
        }
        else
            tabSwitcherThread.interrupt();      
    }

    private static class TabSwitcherThread extends Thread{
        @Override
        public void run() {
           try {
                 //Serve request code

                 //Processing complete, sleep till next request is received (will be interrupted)
                 Thread.sleep(60000);
           } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                //Interrupted execute request
                run();
           }

           //No request received till sleep completed so let the thread die         
        }
   }
}

Thanks

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1  
actually, I think you're TabSwitcherThread will get stackoverflow exception sooner or later because you have recursive call in your run() method :) –  Alvin May 28 '11 at 9:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think what you're looking for is a ThreadPool. Java 5 and above comes with ThreadPoolExecutor. I would suggest you use what is provided with Java instead of writing your own, so you can save yourself a lot of time and hairs.

Of course, if you absolutely has to do it the way you described (hey, sometimes business requirement make our life hard), then use wait() and notify() as Jon suggested. I would not use sleep() in this case because you have to specified timeout, and you never know when the next request will come in. Having a thread that keep waking up then go back to sleep seems a bit wasteful of CPU cycle for me.

Here is a nice tutorial about the ThreadPoolExecutor.

EDIT:

Here is some code example:

public class MyUtils {
    private static UIUpdater worker = null;
    private static ExecutorService exeSrv = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(1);

    public static void handleStateChange(){
        if(tabSwitcherThread == null || !tabSwitcherThread.isAlive()){
            worker = new UIUpdater();
        }     

        //this call does not block 
        exeSrv.submit(worker, new Object());     
    }

    private static class UIUpdater implements Runnable{
        @Override
        public void run() {

           //do server request and update ui.
        }
   }
}
share|improve this answer

I wouldn't use sleep() and interrupt() - I'd use wait() and notify() if I absolutely had to.

However, is there any real need to do this instead of using a ThreadPoolExecutor which can handle the thread reuse for you? Or perhaps use a BlockingQueue in a producer/consumer fashion?

Java already provides enough higher-level building blocks for this that you shouldn't need to go down to this level yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. This is a small java application and I do not want to have 'n' threads pooled to serve the requests. Basically, at a time there would be single request coming in. The situation is like in a textarea the user types something and this needs to be processed. I cannot do it in the same thread as it would cause the UI to freeze and hence need a separate thead. For this I would like to have a dedicated thread and avoid creating new ones as I have experienced considerable delays in creating a new thread. Thanks! –  skk May 28 '11 at 9:32
1  
@skk What's wrong with a pool of 1 thread? :). I have modified my answer with an example code of how you can utilize the Java concurrent framework. I borrowed part of your code, hope you won't mind. –  Alvin May 28 '11 at 9:52
2  
@skk: A producer/consumer queue would do that for you, or a ThreadPoolExecutor with one thread. –  Jon Skeet May 28 '11 at 10:16
    
Jon and Alvin, had a look at the API and yes the ThreadPoolExecutor with one thread fits my needs. Thanks a ton! –  skk May 28 '11 at 10:53
    
@JonSkeet, what is the reason for choosing wait/notify instead of sleep/interrupt? Although it is true that wait() doesn't need a specific timeout, we have the sleep(long millis) which at max value, is roughly up to ~300m years, essentially like wait(). In fact I would argue that sleep/interrupt is more performant because it doesn't need to do redundant synchronizing (it simply gets-the-job-done directly). I would be interested in your thoughts on this issue. –  Pacerier Jul 20 '12 at 10:08

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