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I am going through some exercises and am trying to concatenate two strings using only pointers (no char arrays). My code seems to compile(Note: I am using the old 16-bit Open Watcom compiler):

#include <stdio.h>

int main(){
  char *str1 = "first";
  char *str2 =" second";

  strcat2(str1,str2);

  for(;*str1!='\0';str1++){
      printf(str1);
  }

  return 0;
}

int strcat2(char *s,char *t){
  for(;*s!='\0';s++){
    ;
  }

  while((*s++ = *t++)!='\0'){
    ;
  }

  *t++;
  t='\0';

  return 0;
}

When I tried to run it nothing happens. I am sure my above work is horribly flawed. Any advice and help will be much appreciated.

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3  
hint: where's the space to concat to? –  Mitch Wheat May 28 '11 at 10:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

the str1 and str2 you have declared are string literals, which cannot be modified. In linux executables the contents of the address which the str1 and str2 points to are stored in .rodata section of the executable which is not writeable. In other executables the contents are stored in a similar location which is not writeable. You should use an array or dynamically allocated memory area to do this work. Make sure when concatenating the string to which you are pasting the other string has enough space to hold both of them.

EDIT1:

Either do

char str1[BUFF_SIZ] = "Hello", str2[BUFF_SIZ] = " Man";
/* Now do strcat */ 
/* The strlen (str1) + strlen (str2) should be lessthan BUFF_SIZ */

or

char *str1, *str2;
str1 = malloc (sizeof (char) * BUFF_SIZ);
str1 = malloc (sizeof (char) * BUFF_SIZ);
strcpy (str1, "Hello");
strcpy (str1, " Man");
/* Now do strcat */ 
/* The strlen (str1) + strlen (str2) should be lessthan BUFF_SIZ */
share|improve this answer
1  
The question is from K&R. And it specifically says to concatenate strings using pointers. –  user485498 May 28 '11 at 10:42
1  
@JJG: Check the edit, see if this answers your question. What you have implemented is a pointer usage but unfortunately the contents of the address of the pointer cannot be written as per standards, string literals cannot be written. By using dynamic memory allocation the memory will generally be allocated from heap, and you can change it. For an array also it is stored inside the stack generally which you can write. –  phoxis May 28 '11 at 10:48
    
I'm digesting your answer now. It seems there is no way to do strcat for arbitrary str1 and str2. We have to know beforehand their size, right? –  user485498 May 28 '11 at 10:51
    
see if two string are of length n each then the concatenation would be atmost 2n so you should keep provision of 2n size. –  phoxis May 28 '11 at 10:52

Your code won't work. To be pedantic it invokes undefined behaviour because you are trying to modify the content of a string literal.

char *str1 = "first";
char *str2 =" second";

str1 points to "first" which resides in const memory location.

Instead to having a pointer to the string literal you should have an array of characters with sufficient capacity so as to hold the concatenated string "firstsecond"

This works as per expectation

#include <stdio.h>
int strcat2(char *s,char *t){    
   for(;*s!='\0';s++){
   }
   while((*s++ = *t++)!='\0'){        
   }
   t='\0';
   return 0;
}
int main(){
  char str1[15] = "first";
  char *str2 =" second";

  strcat2(str1,str2);
  printf("%s",str1);
  return 0;
}   

Online demo here

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The question is from the famous K&R reference book. The exercise states: "Write a pointer version of the function strcat... ...strcat(s,t) copies the string t to the end of s." If my method is flawed from inception, how would I do this? –  user485498 May 28 '11 at 10:39
    
@JJG : Modified my post. –  Prasoon Saurav May 28 '11 at 10:45
1  
Thanks for your help. A slight quibble I have is that str1 is a predefined char array. It feels like this goes against the spirit of the question in using pointers. –  user485498 May 28 '11 at 10:53

quote from man:strcat:

  char * strcat ( char * destination, const char * source );
  ...
  Parameters
  destination
  Pointer to the destination array, which should contain a C string, and be large enough to contain the concatenated resulting string.

Your destination string is not large enough.

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You need a writable and large enough buffer to write to, like this

char str1[32] = "first";
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