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I have instance from a class like this:

public class One
{
    Semaphore S = null;
    public One(Semaphore S)
    {
        this.S = S;
    }
    public void Run(int ID)
    {
        S.WaitOne();
        Console.WriteLine("Thread [" + ID + "] Entered");
        Random R = new Random();
        Thread.Sleep(R.Next(100, 1000));
        Console.WriteLine("Thread [" + ID + "] Exited");
        S.Release();
    }
}

In my program I instantiate several new threads. Each thread runs the "Run()" method in the above class.

Semaphore S = new Semaphore(5, 5);
One O = new One(S);
for (int j = 0; j < 10; j++)
{
     Thread T = new Thread(delegate() { O.Run(j); });
     T.Start();
}

I expected to see a list of numbers from 0 to 9 but in non-sorted order. but my result shows that the "ID" variable in "Run()" method as a local variable is shared between all threads.

 ![Output][1]

I want to know if I have one instance of a class and many threads run a method from that instance, so are the local variables of that method shared between all threads? or each thread has its own local copy? Should I create a new instance for each thread from that class?

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I think it's not the ID variable that is shared, but j from the loop.. I think it's passed by reference to the delegates, so they all see the same one.. –  xs0 May 28 '11 at 13:03
    
... deleted ... –  DarkSquirrel42 May 28 '11 at 13:08
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4 Answers

No, local variables are not shared between threads. And your paramter ID is a local var in this respect. It is not shared.

What you see is caused by a standard problem called the captured loop var. It is simple to solve with an extra variable:

for (int j = 0; j < 10; j++)
{
     int copy = j;
     Thread T = new Thread(delegate() { O.Run(copy); });
     T.Start();
}

And I hope this shows where the problem is: the j variable is captured by your anonymous method, in effect this means it is shared (by reference) by all the call-sites of O.Run().

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+1 since this will save me from various void(object) methods ... –  DarkSquirrel42 May 28 '11 at 13:19
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No, locals are not shared between threads. If you are debugging threads be sure to open the threads window so you can switch between threads if you want to watch a variable. Otherwise you may get misleading results if the watch is stuck on one thread.

I get the following output on one run of your program, although due to it's nature you can get different results each time.

Thread [1] Entered
Thread [2] Entered
Thread [4] Entered
Thread [4] Entered
Thread [5] Entered
Thread [2] Exited
Thread [1] Exited
Thread [10] Entered
Thread [6] Entered
Thread [6] Exited
Thread [10] Exited
Thread [9] Entered
Thread [8] Entered
Thread [4] Exited
Thread [5] Exited
Thread [8] Entered
Thread [4] Exited
Thread [8] Exited
Thread [9] Exited
Thread [8] Exited
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try this:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Semaphore S = new Semaphore(5, 5);
    One O = new One(S);
    for (int j = 0; j < 10; j++)
    {
        Thread T = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(O.Run));
        T.Start(j);
    }
}

public class One
{
    Semaphore S = null;
    public One(Semaphore S)
    {
        this.S = S;
    }
    public void Run(object ID)
    {
        // int id = (int) ID;  // when you need an int
        S.WaitOne();
        Console.WriteLine("Thread [" + ID + "] Entered");
        Random R = new Random();
        Thread.Sleep(R.Next(100, 1000));
        Console.WriteLine("Thread [" + ID + "] Exited");
        S.Release();
    }
}
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No, neither local variables, nor method parameters are shared between threads. What you are seeing is because the variable j is shared between the anonymous delegates you are creating. So, in your case, there is one global j and every thread's Run() gets the value the variable has when the method is called, which may be after the j is incremented for the next iteration.

You can fix this by creating a new variable, that is “local” to each iteration:

for (int j = 0; j < 10; j++)
{
     int tmp = j;
     Thread T = new Thread(delegate() { O.Run(tmp); });
     T.Start();
}
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