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I have a trace file that each transaction time represented in Windows filetime format. These time numbers are something like this:

  • 128166372003061629
  • 128166372016382155
  • 128166372026382245

Would you please let me know if there are any C/C++ library in Unix/Linux to extract actual time (specially second) from these numbers ? May I write my own extraction function ?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 20 down vote accepted

it's quite simple: the windows epoch starts 1601-01-01T00:00:00Z. It's 11644473600 seconds before the UNIX/Linux epoch (1970-01-01T00:00:00Z). The Windows ticks are in 100 nanoseconds. Thus, a function to get seconds from the UNIX epoch will be as follows:

#define WINDOWS_TICK 10000000
#define SEC_TO_UNIX_EPOCH 11644473600LL

unsigned WindowsTickToUnixSeconds(long long windowsTicks)
{
     return (unsigned)(windowsTicks / WINDOWS_TICK - SEC_TO_UNIX_EPOCH);
}
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1  
Note that the 11644473600 does not count leap seconds. –  Dietrich Epp May 28 '11 at 18:57
    
But see also Does the windows FILETIME structure include leap seconds? (@DietrichEpp) –  Ian Goldby Jul 12 '12 at 12:47
    
Note that Windows can represent times outside the range of POSIX epoch times, and thus a conversion routine should return an "out-of-range" indication as appropriate. The simplest method is: ` long long secs; time_t t; secs = (windowsTicks / WINDOWS_TICK - SEC_TO_UNIX_EPOCH); t = (time_t) secs; if (secs != (long long) t) return (time_t) -1; return t; ` –  Stan Sieler Mar 2 '13 at 1:11

(I discovered I can't enter readable code in a comment, so...)

Note that Windows can represent times outside the range of POSIX epoch times, and thus a conversion routine should return an "out-of-range" indication as appropriate. The simplest method is:

   ... (as above)
   long long secs;
   time_t t;

   secs = (windowsTicks / WINDOWS_TICK - SEC_TO_UNIX_EPOCH);
   t = (time_t) secs;
   if (secs != (long long) t)    // checks for truncation/overflow/underflow
      return (time_t) -1;   // value not representable as a POSIX time
   return t;
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FILETIME type is is the number 100 ns increments since January 1 1601.

To convert this into a unix time_t you can use the following.

#define TICKS_PER_SECOND 10000000
#define EPOCH_DIFFERENCE 11644473600LL
time_t convertWindowsTimeToUnixTime(long long int input){
    long long int temp;
    temp = input / TICKS_PER_SECOND; //convert from 100ns intervals to seconds;
    temp = temp - EPOCH_DIFFERENCE;  //subtract number of seconds between epochs
    return (time_t) temp;
}

you may then use the ctime functions to manipulate it.

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Note that the intervals here do not count leap seconds. –  Dietrich Epp May 28 '11 at 18:58

Assuming you are asking about the FILETIME Structure, then FileTimeToSystemTime does what you want, you can get the seconds from the SYSTEMTIME structure it produces.

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I think FileTimeToSystemTime can used in Windows only. I am looking for something in Unix/Linux. –  ARH May 30 '11 at 10:25

The solution that divides and adds will not work correctly with daylight savings.

Here is a snippet that works, but it is for windows.

time_t FileTime_to_POSIX(FILETIME ft)
{
    FILETIME localFileTime;
    FileTimeToLocalFileTime(&ft,&localFileTime);
    SYSTEMTIME sysTime;
    FileTimeToSystemTime(&localFileTime,&sysTime);
    struct tm tmtime = {0};
    tmtime.tm_year = sysTime.wYear - 1900;
    tmtime.tm_mon = sysTime.wMonth - 1;
    tmtime.tm_mday = sysTime.wDay;
    tmtime.tm_hour = sysTime.wHour;
    tmtime.tm_min = sysTime.wMinute;
    tmtime.tm_sec = sysTime.wSecond;
    tmtime.tm_wday = 0;
    tmtime.tm_yday = 0;
    tmtime.tm_isdst = -1;
    time_t ret = mktime(&tmtime);
    return ret;
}
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