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I've run into a problem with inheritance in python that I know how to avoid, but don't completely understand. The problem occured while making a menu but I've stripped down the code to only the real problem. code:

class menu:
    buttonlist=[]

>>> class av(menu):
    def __init__(self, num):
        self.buttonlist.append(num)
        print self.buttonlist

>>> AV=av(12)
[12]
>>> class main(menu):
    def __init__(self, num):
        self.buttonlist.append(num)
        print self.buttonlist

>>> Main=main(14)
[12, 14]
>>> AV.buttonlist
[12, 14]

I'd expect to get [14] in return by the 'Main=main(14)', and [12] with the 'AV.buttonlist' but instead it seems append has appended the list in all classes and objects :S can anyone explain to me why this is?

thanks in advance!

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2 Answers 2

Because buttonlist is a class variable, not an instance variable. You need to assign it in the constructor if you want it to be local to the instance.

class menu:
    def __init__(self):
        self.buttonlist = []

And then, of course, remember to call the base constructor in derived classes.

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ok, thnx for the explanation! –  simon May 28 '11 at 13:27

@Cat beat me to it, but here is some working code

class Menu(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.buttonlist = []

class AV(Menu):
    def __init__(self, num):
        Menu.__init__(self)
        self.buttonlist.append(num)
        print self.buttonlist

class Main(Menu):
    def __init__(self, num):
        Menu.__init__(self)
        self.buttonlist.append(num)
        print self.buttonlist

>>> av = AV(12)
>>> main = Main(14)

Note that the convention is to name python classes with CamelCase so your av class would be AV and menu would be Menu. This is by no means required though.

share|improve this answer
    
wow, quick responces, thnx for the explanation –  simon May 28 '11 at 13:26
1  
I suggest you use super(AV, self).__init__() instead of Menu.__init__(self) in AV.__init__, and make an according change in Main.__init__ (deducing this is Python 2.x because of the bracketless print) –  tzot May 28 '11 at 13:58
    
@ΤΖΩΤΖΙΟΥ: Yep, good point –  Rob Cowie May 28 '11 at 17:31

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