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I have read all question for this type of problem but I can't fix mine. The problem is that I use a function for reading data from a file and I get this error: "Stack around variable 'p' was corrupted" This is the function

Firm readFirm(char* name)
{
FILE* file = NULL;
int i = 0;
Firm firm;
char line[100];
char* p[5] = {(char*)malloc(50)};

char tmp[50];
strcpy(tmp,name);
strcat(tmp,".txt");
file = fopen(tmp,"rb");

getline(file,line,100);
strcpy(firm.name,line);
getline(file,line,100);
strcpy(firm.EIK,line);
getline(file,line,100);
split(p,line," ");
for (i = 0 ; p[i] != NULL; i++)
    firm.price[i] = atoi(p[i]);
getline(file,line,100);

split(p,line,".");
firm.day = atoi(p[0]);
firm.month = atoi(p[1]);
firm.year = atoi(p[2]);
fclose(file);
return firm;

}

Please help because I don't know how to fix it!

This is the split function:

char ** split( char *result[], char *w, const char *delim)
{
int i=0;
char *p=NULL;
for(i=0, result[0]=NULL, p=strtok(w, delim); p!=NULL; p=strtok(NULL, delim), i++ )
{
       result[i]=p;
       result[i+1]=NULL;
}
return result;
}
share|improve this question
    
what is char* p[5] = {(char*)malloc(50)}; supposed to do? –  George Kastrinis May 28 '11 at 16:47
    
This is a two dimensional array which I use it for the split function –  Jordan Borisov May 28 '11 at 16:49
    
what the heck is this: char* p[5] = {(char*)malloc(50)};, i think you wanted something like auto initializing the array, like char arr[10] = {0}; this wont work, because for each location you need separate memory address. –  phoxis May 28 '11 at 16:50

2 Answers 2

The declaration char* p[5] = {(char*)malloc(50)}; has issues. It causes p[1], p[2], p[3], and p[4] to be initialized to garbage, most probably, not many would be NULL, which is what the loop tests for.

There are also problems with the use of getline(), most notably that the parameters are in the wrong order and not sufficiently indirected.

share|improve this answer
    
OK and how to fix this? –  Jordan Borisov May 28 '11 at 16:50
    
@George I think the OP really wants an array of char*. –  Pascal Cuoq May 28 '11 at 16:54

change the line:

char* p[5] = {(char*)malloc(50)};

to

char *p[5];
int i=0, n=5;

/* Allocate */ 
for (i=0; i<n; i++)
{
  p[i] = malloc (sizeof (char) * 50);
}

/* Do work */

/* Deallocate */

for (i=0; i<n; i++)
{
  free (p[i]);
}

EDIT1:

it looks like you wanted to achieve default assignment of the remaining locations like we can do with

char arr[10] = {0};

But in your case you have

char *p[5];

and for each location of p you need a separate memory location which needs to be individually assigned/allocated to and freed/deallocated from like above.

EDIT2:

In your split function you are doing a terrible thing. If you have allocated the memory for p in the main and then you pass it to the split function, then why are you assigning a pointer again into the p array elements. Each of the element of p points to an entire array (block of memory) which can be used to hold a string. So you should copy the part of the string into p[i] for some index i, with strcpy.

Also why are you returning the array? You have passed it as a pointer, and all the modifications you do to it in the function will persist after the return.

EDIT3:

Here is the modified split, made by applying minimum modifications to your code.

void split( char *result[], char *w, const char *delim)
{
    int i=0;
    char *p;

    for(i=0, p=strtok(w, delim); p!=NULL; p=strtok(NULL, delim), i++ )
    {
       strcpy (result[i], p);
    }
}

Here is a test main function:

int main (void)
{

  char arr[128] = "10.08.1989";
  char *p[5];
  int i, n = 5;

  for (i=0; i<n; i++)
  {
    p[i] = malloc (sizeof (char) * 50);
  }

  split (p, arr, ".");

  printf ("%s\n", p[0]);
  printf ("%s\n", p[1]);
  printf ("%s\n", p[2]);


  for (i=0; i<n; i++)
  {
    free (p[i]);
  }
  printf ("\n");
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The same problem. In this function I use the variable two times and when I allocate the 'p' and before use it again free the allocate memory the program crash very bad. –  Jordan Borisov May 28 '11 at 16:59
    
what do you want actually a dynamically allocated array of char type with length 50? or 5 such arrays, ie a 2D array line structure. –  phoxis May 28 '11 at 17:01
    
OK I have for an example this string "13.05.2009" and I have to split it in this 2D array "13","05","2009" with a delimiter "." and thats why I need 2D array. –  Jordan Borisov May 28 '11 at 17:04
    
then you need to allocate separate memory for each string if you are dynamically allocating the strings, like the example above. –  phoxis May 28 '11 at 17:07
    
This doesn't work and I don't know why. Please help! –  Jordan Borisov May 28 '11 at 17:21

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