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i am just tyring to write a simple code that would print a user's input. here's what i have:

<script type="text/javascript">
    function displayText() {
        var input = document.getElementById('input').value;
        document.getElementById('p').innerHTML = input;
        }
    }
</script>

and

<font face="arial" size="5" color="blue">Input section</font> <br/>
Query Sequence
<form name="form">
<textarea id="input" rows="8" cols="60" id="input" ></textarea><br/>
<button type="button" style="height: 25px; width: 100px" onClick="displayText()">Display Date</button><br/>
<p id="p"></p>
</form>

i have no idea why it doesn't work... and another little question: what is the difference between assigning an ID and a name to a form tag in html? thanks!

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1  
Would you mind renaming your question to a … well … question? –  toscho May 28 '11 at 17:36
    
use error console to find script errors in browser.for ff ctr+shif+j –  gowri May 28 '11 at 17:38
    
it should print in 'p' what ever the user type in the textarea, but it doesn't. my question - why? –  yotamoo May 28 '11 at 17:40
    
Obligatory link for people learning JavaScript: Best Resources for learning JavaScript, and in particular A re-introduction to JavaScript –  Zecc May 28 '11 at 17:56
    
Imagine someone with the same problem – how could she find the answer? –  toscho May 28 '11 at 18:02
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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted
function displayText() {
    var input = document.getElementById('input').value;
    document.getElementById('p').innerHTML = input;
    } <--- extra brace
}

EDIT: in response to the note:

what is the difference between assigning an ID and a name to a form tag in html

An ID uniquely identifies the element, and can be used in either CSS styling, or to quickly obtain the element in JavaScript as you are doing.

The name attribute is what's used by the server side to identify the element and get it's value. For example:

<textarea id="input" name="textinput" rows="8" cols="60" id="input" ></textarea>

If this form was posted to a PHP script, you would access the value with like this:

echo $_POST['textinput'];

You can also navigate to elements using the name, but it's not recommended.

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In addition I can recommend getting the Firebug addon. If you run open original sample and click the "Console" tab of the addon it would say "Syntax error '}' line ..." –  Jeroen May 28 '11 at 17:44
    
I keep hearing ID called a unique identifier, but in many cases you cannot count on that and a JS method is even named getElementsById("id"); and returns all elements with the id "id" –  Jonathon Wisnoski May 28 '11 at 18:04
    
@ Jonathon Wisnoski It's supposed to be unique according to the standard: "This attribute assigns a name to an element. This name must be unique in a document." (w3.org/TR/html40/struct/global.html#h-7.5.2). If you try and give a validating XML parser a document with more than one element containing the same ID, it will laugh at you and steal candy from babies. Some browsers are forgiving though, and try to do the best they can despite a broken document. –  onteria_ May 28 '11 at 18:13
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the code works fine in you example tho i se a } to much maybe thats why yours dosent work.

all modern browsers have good development tools you should try them they will tell you about syntactic errors.

the id is the id of your element in your dom the name is the name of the field that the value of that input is gonna represent when you post a form.

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All modern browsers - except Internet Explorer. I think it still lags Firefox and Chrome. –  duffymo May 28 '11 at 17:48
    
ie8+ have nice tools to –  megakorre May 28 '11 at 17:52
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