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I want to do this:

public class ValueContainer<T> {
  public T Value { get; set; }
}

Then I want to assign a value to it like this:

private ValueContainer<string> value;
value = "hello";

I'm sure I've seen this somewhere but can't figure out how to do it.

TIA

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You mean value.Value = "hello"; ? –  Henk Holterman May 28 '11 at 18:14
    
Nope, I meant it as stated. –  enashnash May 28 '11 at 18:16
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use a custom implicit operator, e.g:

public static implicit operator ValueContainer<T>(T value) {
    return new ValueContainer { Value = value };
}

While this is a nice language feature of C#, it is not CLS compliant and won't be supported by other .NET languages like VB.NET, so if you are designing types to be reused with other languages, its worth baring that in mind.

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You could run into some interesting situations with ValueContainer<object> object something; ValueContainer<object> x = new ValueContainer<object>(something); ValueContainer<object> y = (object)(new ValueContainer<object>(something)); –  pickles May 28 '11 at 19:47
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Creating your own implicit operator will take care of this problem.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {    
        Container<string> container;
        container = "hello";
    }
}

public class Container<T>
{
    public T Value { get; set; }

    public static implicit operator Container<T>(T val)
    {
        return new Container<T> { Value = val };
    }
}
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