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function other3($x, $y)
{
    $tmp = $x + $y
    return $tmp
}

$x = 5
$y = 10

$a = other3($x, $y)
Write-Host $a

Keeps returning 5 10 when it should be returning 15, what's the deal?

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2  
tip: avoid the return keyword unless you really want to exit a function early. all values not explictly captured are returned from powershell in functions. –  x0n May 29 '11 at 2:29
    
I Do not agree with this comment. I would say avoid using output in a function and just build a var to return, it's called structured programmation and the code will be more readable. It can be a discussion thread :o) –  JPBlanc May 29 '11 at 6:27
1  
@jpblanc You're welcome to disagree. Implicit returns are tenets of functional programming. There's more to life (and programming) than structured. –  x0n May 29 '11 at 17:45
    
I just would say let's begin by the begining ... Powershell is a script language. As far as I know using return in only one point is not so far fron the concept of functional programming. –  JPBlanc May 29 '11 at 18:39
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2 Answers

To call other3 with two parameters, drop the parenthesis "()" e.g.

$a = other3 $x  $y

The way you're currently calling it, actually passes one parameter, an array with two elements, i.e. 5 and 10. The second parameter is empty (probably defaults to null), meaning the addition does nothing and you simply return the $x parameter.

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Problem fixed, forgot to remove comma –  nullcakes May 28 '11 at 20:33
    
Make same mistake the whole time - powershell is so similar to C# in some ways, the subtle differences can really have you scratching your head when things like this happens. Just stick with it though. –  cristobalito May 28 '11 at 20:37
    
I've never used C#, I'm from a C/C++, Python, Java background. –  nullcakes May 28 '11 at 20:40
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You're passing a list (5,10) to the parameter $x and $null to $y.

When the function adds $null to the list, you just get the list back.

Adding some write-host statements to the function should make this clear:

function other3($x, $y)
{
    $tmp = $x + $y
    write-host "`x=($x)"
    write-host "`y=($y)"
    return $tmp
}

$x = 5
$y = 10

$a = other3($x, $y)
Write-Host $a
share|improve this answer
    
Aha, so that is what is going on. Gotcha –  nullcakes May 28 '11 at 20:37
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