Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying out a very simple cpp program on osx just to get myself familiar with the osx platform, so I am very surprised to encounter any error message.

Here is the code:

#include <iostream> 
using namespace std; 
int main() { 
  cout << "Hello, world!" << endl; 
  return 0; 
}

I compile it by running

gcc -Wall hello.cpp -o hello

Then I get this 'undefined symbols' message:

Undefined symbols:
  "std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >& std::operator<< <std::char_traits<char> >(std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >&, char const*)", referenced from:
      _main in ccA9oElQ.o
  "std::ios_base::Init::Init()", referenced from:
      __static_initialization_and_destruction_0(int, int)in ccA9oElQ.o
  "std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >::size() const", referenced from:
      std::__verify_grouping(char const*, unsigned long, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > const&)in ccA9oElQ.o
  "std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >::operator[](unsigned long) const", referenced from:
      std::__verify_grouping(char const*, unsigned long, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > const&)in ccA9oElQ.o
      std::__verify_grouping(char const*, unsigned long, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > const&)in ccA9oElQ.o
      std::__verify_grouping(char const*, unsigned long, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > const&)in ccA9oElQ.o
  "___gxx_personality_v0", referenced from:
      std::__verify_grouping(char const*, unsigned long, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > const&)in ccA9oElQ.o
      _main in ccA9oElQ.o
      ___tcf_0 in ccA9oElQ.o
      unsigned long const& std::min<unsigned long>(unsigned long const&, unsigned long const&)in ccA9oElQ.o
      __static_initialization_and_destruction_0(int, int)in ccA9oElQ.o
      global constructors keyed to mainin ccA9oElQ.o
      CIE in ccA9oElQ.o
  "std::ios_base::Init::~Init()", referenced from:
      ___tcf_0 in ccA9oElQ.o
  "std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >& std::endl<char, std::char_traits<char> >(std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >&)", referenced from:
      _main in ccA9oElQ.o
  "std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >::operator<<(std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >& (*)(std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >&))", referenced from:
      _main in ccA9oElQ.o
  "std::cout", referenced from:
      _main in ccA9oElQ.o
ld: symbol(s) not found
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

I do not know if it is related: I have both xcode 3 and xcode 4 installed on my MBP

Here is the version information:

$ gcc -v
Using built-in specs.
Target: i686-apple-darwin10
Configured with: /var/tmp/gcc/gcc-5666.3~6/src/configure --disable-checking --enable-werror --prefix=/usr --mandir=/share/man --enable-languages=c,objc,c++,obj-c++ --program-transform-name=/^[cg][^.-]*$/s/$/-4.2/ --with-slibdir=/usr/lib --build=i686-apple-darwin10 --program-prefix=i686-apple-darwin10- --host=x86_64-apple-darwin10 --target=i686-apple-darwin10 --with-gxx-include-dir=/include/c++/4.2.1
Thread model: posix
gcc version 4.2.1 (Apple Inc. build 5666) (dot 3)

System information

$ uname -a
Darwin mbp002.local 10.7.0 Darwin Kernel Version 10.7.0: Sat Jan 29 15:17:16 PST 2011; root:xnu-1504.9.37~1/RELEASE_I386 i386
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Use g++ instead of gcc since you’re compiling a C++ program:

g++ -Wall hello.cpp -o hello

Alternatively, use clang++ since Apple haven’t updated GCC in a while and it’s unlikely they’ll ever update it:

clang++ -Wall hello.cpp -o hello
share|improve this answer
    
+1, but in your command it's still gcc (: –  Kiril Kirov May 29 '11 at 9:55
1  
@Kiril No, it’s not! ;-) (but yeah, it was) –  Bavarious May 29 '11 at 9:56
    
@Bevarious: thanks for the answer! When I try 'clang++', I got 'command not found' error. I can call clang though, but it gives me a bunch of error message. (I suppose it is gcc vs g++ kind of issue?!) –  Anthony Kong May 29 '11 at 9:58
    
@Anthony You don’t have /usr/bin/clang++? It could be the case that you haven’t installed the command-line utilities in Xcode 4, and maybe Xcode 3 doesn’t install clang++ because C++ support in Clang is rather recent. The command-line utilities are an optional install if I remember correctly. –  Bavarious May 29 '11 at 10:00
1  
Alternatively, get gcc4.6 from macports. –  juanchopanza May 29 '11 at 10:07

Run it using g++

g++ -Wall hello.cpp -o hello

If you use gcc, the C++ libraries are not linked in by default.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.