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Given the following code:

using System.Collections.Generic;
static class Program {
	static void Main() {
		bar Bar = new bar();
		baz Baz = new baz();
		System.Console.WriteLine(
			"We have {0} bars, rejoice!", bar.Cache.Count);
	}
}

public abstract class foo {
	public static List<foo> Cache = new List<foo>(); 
}

public class bar : foo {
	public bar() { Cache.Add(this); }
}
public class baz : foo {
	public baz() { Cache.Add(this); }
}

You get the (somewhat expected) output "We have 2 bars, rejoice!".

This is fabulous, we now have twice as many places to have our beer (apparently), but what I really want is for each class to have it's own cache. The reason I don't want to just implement this cache in the subclass is because I also have some methods in my abstract class that needs to be able to operate on the cache (namely, to iterate over all of them). Is there a way to do this? I've looked at using an interface for foo, but the interface doesn't allow static members to be defined as part of the interface.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Each derived class of foo should define how/where to get a cache, so each can (potentially) have its own cache. Methods in foo can refer to GetCache() without the implementation being known.

public abstract class foo
{
    public abstract ICache GetCache();

    public void DoSomethingToCache()
    {
        ICache cache = this.GetCache();
        cache.DoSomething();
    }
}

public class bar : foo
{
    public static ICache BarCache = new FooCache();

    public override ICache GetCache()
    {
        return bar.BarCache;
    }
}

public class FooCache : ICache { }
share|improve this answer
    
Good thing we have the "load new answers" feature. I was about to post this. –  moffdub Mar 5 '09 at 22:01
    
ICache being an interface to a generic cache type? Actually, you're right, I do like this better even though thinkcube's answer was closer to what I was initially looking for. This one is more design work for me to do now though ;) –  Matthew Scharley Mar 5 '09 at 22:06
1  
I disagree that this is better. Now each subclass has to worry about providing its own singleton. More potential for code duplication. Instead you could still use generics to get the per class singleton and expose it once using GetCache() but each subclass is not forced to implement it. –  Carlos A. Ibarra Mar 5 '09 at 22:20
    
Edited my solution to illustrate what I meant. –  Carlos A. Ibarra Mar 5 '09 at 22:28
    
The reasoning behind why I think this is better is because the reason I'm caching at all is hidden behind the question: –  Matthew Scharley Mar 5 '09 at 22:29

Use a generic base class parameterized with the subclass:

using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;

static class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        bar Bar = new bar();
        baz Baz = new baz();
        System.Console.WriteLine(
                "We have {0} bars, rejoice!", Bar.GetCache().Count);
    }
}

public abstract class foo<T>
{
    private static List<foo<T> > Cache = new List<foo<T> >();

    public IList GetCache()
    {
        return Cache;
    }
}

public class bar : foo<bar>
{
    public bar() { GetCache().Add(this); }
}
public class baz : foo<baz>
{
    public baz() { GetCache().Add(this); }
}
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Very nice, thankyou! –  Matthew Scharley Mar 5 '09 at 21:54
    
Bah, beat me by 6 minutes. Good show. –  Chris Holmes Mar 5 '09 at 21:57
    
For the record, it should probably be: public abstract class foo<T> where T : foo<T> –  Matthew Scharley Mar 5 '09 at 21:59
    
@monoxide - if you want a polymorphic solution, I think Rex M's answer is much cleaner. –  overslacked Mar 5 '09 at 22:02
    
@Overslacked I agree ;) –  Rex M Mar 5 '09 at 22:03
public abstract class foo {
    public abstract List<foo> Cache { get; }

    protected static Dictionary<Type, List<foo>> InnerCache = new Dictionary<Type, List<foo>>(); 
}

public class bar : foo {
    public override List<foo> Cache { 
       get { return foo.InnerCache[typeof(bar)]; } 
    }

    public bar() { Cache.Add(this); }
}

public class baz : foo {
    public override List<foo> Cache { 
       get { return foo.InnerCache[typeof(baz)]; } 
    }

    public baz() { Cache.Add(this); }
}
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Arg, beat me to it. My exact idea. –  strager Mar 5 '09 at 21:57

Here's your answer:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
static class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var bar = new Bar();
        var baz = new Baz();
        System.Console.WriteLine(
                "We have {0} bars, rejoice!", Bar.Cache.Count);

        bar.PrintList();
        baz.PrintList();
    }
}

public abstract class Foo<T>
{
    public static List<T> Cache = new List<T>();

    public void PrintList()
    {
        foreach(var item in Cache)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(item);

        }
    }
}

public class Bar : Foo<Bar>
{
    public Bar() { Cache.Add(this); }
}
public class Baz : Foo<Baz>
{
    public Baz() { Cache.Add(this); }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It's a cache of all the objects of that type. How does that work if it's non-static? –  Matthew Scharley Mar 5 '09 at 21:42
    
"but what I really want is for each class to have it's own cache" - You either do, or you don't. Pick one. –  Chris Holmes Mar 5 '09 at 21:45
    
Each class, not each instance. –  Szymon Rozga Mar 5 '09 at 21:45
    
Each SUBCLASS to maintain it's cache, not each instance of the class, which is what taking off the static declaration would do. –  Matthew Scharley Mar 5 '09 at 21:46
    
You just answered your own question. "each class". Then it's a class-level variable. Don't make this harder than it is. –  Chris Holmes Mar 5 '09 at 21:47

try this:

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System;
static class Program
{
  static void Main()
  {
    Bar bar = new Bar();
    Baz baz = new Baz();
    System.Console.WriteLine(
            "We have {0} bars, rejoice!", bar.Cache.Count);
    System.Console.ReadKey();
  }
}

public abstract class Foo
{
  public Foo()
  {
    Cache = new List<string>();
  }
  public List<String> Cache { get; set; }
}

public class Bar : Foo
{
  public Bar() 
  { 
    Cache.Add("Bar"); 
  }
}
public class Baz : Foo
{
  public Baz() { Cache.Add("Baz"); }
}

Sorry I had to change the casing.. It was making my head explode

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