Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Here is my code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct product {
  int weight;
  float price;
} apple, banana, melon; // can I declare like this ?????

int main()
{
  apple a;

}

When I compiled this sample, the compiler says:

struct.cpp|11|error: expected ';' before 'a'|

Same thing works fine in C language ...

What's wrong?

share|improve this question
1  
Ignoring the C++ syntax in the header and namespace (which aren't needed to reproduce the problem with the almost minimal code you have here), the code would not compile in C, either. While C and C++ are different languages, they are at least similar in that. – Jonathan Leffler May 29 '11 at 14:48

What you've done is declared apple, banana and melon as global instances of product whereas your main function indicates that you wanted to declare them as types. To do this you would use the typedef keyword in the declaration. (Although why do you need so many synonyms for struct product?)

This is not different from C. The only difference between C and C++ in your example is that in C++ product names a type whereas in C you have to specify struct product. (Apart from the more obvious fact that you can't have #include <iostream> or using namespace std; in C.)

E.g., declares apple, banana and melon as synonyms for struct product:

typedef struct product {
  int weight;
  float price;
} apple, banana, melon;
share|improve this answer

apple isn't a type, it's a variable of the product struct type you declared.

typedef product apple;

would create a type called apple.

share|improve this answer
    
That's pure C++; in C, you'd need typedef struct product apple;, of course. Since the question is tagged C++ and not C, this a pure observation - not a criticism. – Jonathan Leffler May 29 '11 at 14:49

No it doesn't. In C you would write

typedef struct product {
   int weight;
   float price;
} apple;

Note the typedef.

share|improve this answer

How could the same code run in C? your code will give the same error in C also, it is incorrect.

in the main you have done: apple a where apple is not any type. It is a global struct product type variable.

To define a variable of your structure type do:

int main (void)
{
  struct product a;
}

Or if you want to name your struct with some name you can use typedef like

typedef struct product {
     int weight;
     float price;
} product;

and then

int main (void)
{
  product apple, a, whataver;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.