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In objective-C I want to have a child class call or invoke a parent's method. As in the parent has allocated the child and the child does something that would invoke a parent method. like so:

//in the parent class
childObject *newChild = [[childClass alloc] init];
[newChild doStuff];

//in the child class
-(void)doStuff {
    if (something happened) {
        [parent respond];
    }
}

How could I go about doing this? (if you could explain thoroughly I would appreciate it)

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can use a delegate for this: have childClass define a delegate protocol and a delegate property that conforms to that protocol. Then your example would change to something like this:

// in the parent class
childObject *newChild = [[childClass alloc] init];
newChild.delegate = self;
[newChild doStuff];

// in the child class
-(void)doStuff {
    if (something happened) {
        [self.delegate respond];
    }
}

There's an example of how to declare and use a delegate protocol here: How do I set up a simple delegate to communicate between two view controllers?

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There's not really a lot to explain.

For use in this situation you have the keyword super, which is a lot like self, except that it refers to what self had been had it been a member of its own immediate superclass:

// in the child class
- (void)doStuff {
  if (something happened) {
    [super respond];
  }
}
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1  
That's not right - super refers to an object's superclass, not the object that instantiated it. – Simon Whitaker May 29 '11 at 18:26
    
@Simon Whitaker: He is asking about a child class. Not the correct terminology, sure, but it's a leap to suggest he wants to talk to the instantiating object. – Williham Totland May 29 '11 at 18:33
2  
Not really - that's exactly what he specifies in his question. "The parent has allocated the child and the child does something that would invoke a parent method." Agree that the terminology's poorly used though. – Simon Whitaker May 29 '11 at 18:39
1  
@Simon Whitaker: That sentence could equally well refer to subclassing and delegation. – Williham Totland May 29 '11 at 19:03
1  
Actually I want the instantiating object. I don't know what the "correct" terminology would be for an object that allocates another. – Danegraphics May 29 '11 at 19:27

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