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I've got an element that I want to have a shadow accent just on one end, like this (from Photoshop): enter image description here

The closest I've gotten is like this (HTML + CSS3): enter image description here

So, is it possible to make the shadow fade, like in the first picture? Here's my code as is:

box-shadow: 0px 0px  5px 1px rgba(0,0,0,.4);
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Note that all changes other than the shadow on the light blue bar are intentional. –  Nathan May 29 '11 at 20:02

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

It is indeed possible to achieve this effect with CSS only, but the CSS is mind-bending:

.container {
  background-color: rgba(168,214,255,1);
  padding: 20px;
}
.tab {
  height: 50px;
  background-color: #4790CE;
  margin-bottom: 10px;
  border-radius: 20px;
  position: relative;
}

.tab.active {
  background-color: #63B6FF;
  border-radius: 20px 0 0 20px;
   box-shadow: 0 0 15px #3680BD;
}

.tab .shadow {
  position: absolute;
  top: -10px;
  left: 50px;
  right: -20px;
  bottom: -10px;
  border-radius: 20px;
  background-color: transparent;
  -webkit-border-image: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, right top, color-stop(10%,rgba(168,214,255,0)), color-stop(80%,rgba(168,214,255,1))) 50 50 stretch;
  border-width: 10px 20px 10px 0;
}

You basically use border-image to mask the dropshadow. You would be able to achieve this without extra markup through the :after pseudo-selector, but :after doesn't play nice with animation.

enter image description here

View the demo on jsfiddle (Webkit only, but you can adapt it easily to FF. IE9 would be out of luck, unfortunately).

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Beautiful! I'll get to work implementing that for FF. That must've been a lot of work; thanks a million! –  Nathan May 30 '11 at 13:58
2  
With few adjustments you do not need extra markup but can have it with :after pseudoclass (Webkit) jsfiddle.net/HerrSerker/Zb5Qn/26 –  HerrSerker Dec 6 '11 at 15:23

You'll want to break up the element into two parts - one part for the left with the shadow which would only need to be a few pixels - probably not more than five - the rest of the element will be everything that does not need to have a shadow.

After you break up the element into two parts, you'll have some css that looks like this:

#left-shadow
box-shadow: 0px 0px  5px 1px rgba(0,0,0,.4);

#right-no-shadow
box-shadow 0px 0px 0px 0px
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1  
but that alone wouldn't create a fading effect. –  stefs May 29 '11 at 20:07
    
The shear edge doesn't look so nice. Like this or this. –  Nathan May 29 '11 at 21:04

i think it might be possible by creating shorter length clones of the bars below the real bars, apply the drop shadow to the clones and hide the cloned bars with a color transition to transparent.

really messy, but i can't think of any other way.

put those over each other (first layer on top, third layer at the bottom).

edit: damn, i accidentially used the wrong bar for the first layer! it should have been a bar without drop shadow. sorry for that!

i don't think there's a clean solution, though.

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Hmm, I don't quite understand what you're getting at. When you say "Put those over each other", do you mean on top over or higher on the y-axis? I guess I'm not quite grasping how they would fit together. Are you suggesting that I position the second layer so that it covers only the shadow of the first layer? That's not a bad idea, but this is already a pretty messy layout. And considering that I'm going to be animating the whole thing with jQuery, I'm not sure I'll go with it. Thanks though, a good idea. I'll accept if nothing cleaner is posted. –  Nathan May 29 '11 at 20:56
    
on top of each other. the third layer provides the drop shadow, the second layer lets the drop shadow fade out, and the first (and top most) layer displays the content. it would only work on plain colored backgrounds, and you're not very flexible with this solution. –  stefs Jun 1 '11 at 12:18
    
Looks like the image link broke, can you upload it again? –  Tim Post Nov 15 '11 at 15:18
    
sorry, but i don't think i still have that image. also, my solution became most likely irrelevant - if you don't want the broken image link, feel free to remove the whole answer. –  stefs Nov 16 '11 at 16:37

I found some other solution:

Put two divs inside which cut the tab in half horizontally, give them the box-shadows and appropriate border-radii, and rotate them slightly, the one CW the other CCW.

http://jsfiddle.net/Zb5Qn/32/

would be better with 3d transform, but that is only webkit


HTML

<div class="container">
    <div class="tab">
        <div class="content">Tab3</div>
    </div>
    <div class="tab active">
        <div class="shadow1"></div>
        <div class="shadow2"></div>
        <div class="content">Tab2</div>
    </div>
    <div class="tab">
        <div class="content">Tab3</div>
    </div>
</div>​

CSS

.container {
  background-color: rgba(255,255,255,1);
  padding: 20px;
}
.tab {
    position: relative;
}
.tab .content{
  height: 50px;
  background-color: #4790CE;
  margin-bottom: 10px;
  border-radius: 20px;
  position: relative;
  line-height: 50px;
    padding-left: 50px;
}

.tab.active .content {
  background-color: #63B6FF;
  border-radius: 20px 0 0 20px;
    position:relative;

}
.tab .content {
    position:relative;
    z-index:2;
 background: red;   
}
.tab .shadow1 {
   box-shadow: 0px 0px  5px 1px rgba(0,0,0,.4);
    position:absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    right:10px;
    bottom: 50%;
    border-radius: 20px 0 0 3px;
z-index: 1;

    -moz-transform: rotate(0.5deg);
-moz-transform-origin: 0 50%;
    -webkit-transform: rotate(0.5deg);
    -webkit-transform-origin: 0 50%;
    -o-transform: rotate(0.5deg);
    -o-transform-origin: 0 50%;
    -ms-transform: rotate(0.5deg);
    -ms-transform-origin: 0 50%;




}

.shadow2 {
   box-shadow: 0px 0px  5px 1px rgba(0,0,0,.4);
    position:absolute;
    top: 50%;
    left: 0;
    right:10px;
    bottom: 0;
    border-radius: 3px 0 0 20px;
    z-index: 1;
    -webkit-transform: rotate(-0.5deg);
-webkit-transform-origin: 0 50%;
    -moz-transform: rotate(-0.5deg);
-moz-transform-origin: 0 50%;
    -o-transform: rotate(-0.5deg);
    -o-transform-origin: 0 50%;
    -ms-transform: rotate(-0.5deg); 
    -ms-transform-origin: 0 50%;
}​
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try this - box-shadow: -5px 0px 13px -3px #333;

-3px is the shadow-spread. lower it to reduce the area of shadow.

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