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In ASP.NET MVC3, the following two methods seem to return the same results:

public ActionResult Blah()
{
    return JavaScript("alert('" + DateTime.Now + "');");
}

public ActionResult Blah()
{
    return Content("alert('" + DateTime.Now + "');");
}

But, when I view the results of the first one in Google Chrome, the font is a Mono-Spaced font, whereas the second is Arial (or something).

This leads me to believe that there is probably a header "content-type" of "text/javascript" or something coming across the wire...

My question then is this:

  • What does the "JavaScript" function (which yields a JavaScriptResult) do that the Content method (which yields a ContentResult) does not do?

  • What are the benefits to this method?

Please, do not include religious reasons as to why this method is "bad"... I'm only concerned with knowing the "what"... as in "what does it do?"

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The javascript actionresult sets the response.ContentType to application/x-javascript where as the content actionresult can be set by calling its ContentType property.

JavascriptResult:

using System;
namespace System.Web.Mvc
{
    public class JavaScriptResult : ActionResult
    {
        public string Script
        {
            get;
            set;
        }
        public override void ExecuteResult(ControllerContext context)
        {
            if (context == null)
            {
                throw new ArgumentNullException("context");
            }
            HttpResponseBase response = context.HttpContext.Response;
            response.ContentType = "application/x-javascript";
            if (this.Script != null)
            {
                response.Write(this.Script);
            }
        }
    }
} 

ContentResult

public class ContentResult : ActionResult
{
    public string Content
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
    public Encoding ContentEncoding
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
    public string ContentType
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
    public override void ExecuteResult(ControllerContext context)
    {
        if (context == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("context");
        }
        HttpResponseBase response = context.HttpContext.Response;
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(this.ContentType))
        {
            response.ContentType = this.ContentType;
        }
        if (this.ContentEncoding != null)
        {
            response.ContentEncoding = this.ContentEncoding;
        }
        if (this.Content != null)
        {
            response.Write(this.Content);
        }
    }
}

The benefits are you are being explicit in your MVC code that this is JS and that you result is being sent to the client with the correct ContentType.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you include an actual benefit ... such as "browser 'xyz' will not execute JavaScript unless you include this content header" or something? –  Timothy Khouri May 29 '11 at 23:19
    
That is the benefit. A client can make decisions based on the response metadata. –  Ronnie Overby Feb 23 '12 at 22:02

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