Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using GLSL.

I have a simple fragment shader here:

 "uniform sampler2D backBuffer;",
 "uniform float r;",
 "uniform float g;",
 "uniform float b;",
 "uniform float ratio;",
 "void main() {",
 "  vec4 color;",
 "  float avg, dr, dg, db, multiplier;",
 "  color = texture2D(backBuffer, vec2(gl_TexCoord[0].x * 1,gl_TexCoord[0].y * 1));",
 "  avg = (color.r + color.g + color.b) / 3.0;",
 "  dr = avg * r;",
 "  dg = avg * g;",
 "  db = avg * b;",
 "  color.r =  color.r * (gl_TexCoord[0].x * gl_TexCoord[0].y);",
"   color.g =  color.g * (gl_TexCoord[0].x * gl_TexCoord[0].y);",
"   color.b =  color.b * (gl_TexCoord[0].x * gl_TexCoord[0].y);",
 "  gl_FragColor = color;",
 "}"

Now it works just fine.

However, for some very strange reason, adding any more variables such as a vec2 or float causes it to have no effect on my scene:

 "uniform sampler2D backBuffer;",
 "uniform float r;",
 "uniform float g;",
 "uniform float b;",
 "uniform float ratio;",
 "void main() {",
 "  vec4 color;",
 "  float avg, dr, dg, db, multiplier;",
 "  vec2 divisors;",
 "  color = texture2D(backBuffer, vec2(gl_TexCoord[0].x * 1,gl_TexCoord[0].y * 1));",
 "  avg = (color.r + color.g + color.b) / 3.0;",
 "  dr = avg * r;",
 "  dg = avg * g;",
 "  db = avg * b;",
 "  color.r =  color.r * (gl_TexCoord[0].x * gl_TexCoord[0].y);",
"   color.g =  color.g * (gl_TexCoord[0].x * gl_TexCoord[0].y);",
"   color.b =  color.b * (gl_TexCoord[0].x * gl_TexCoord[0].y);",
 "  gl_FragColor = color;",
 "}"

In this one I added a vec2 called divisors, that's all I did and the shader no longer does anything to the pixels.

Why is this? Is there something I do not understand about variable declaration in GLSL?

Thanks

share|improve this question
3  
Check the error logs (call glGetShaderInfoLog) after compiling and after linking the shaders -- they might tell you something useful –  Chris Dodd May 29 '11 at 20:19
    
@Chris Dodd The string returns an empty string. –  Milo May 29 '11 at 20:28
    
Untagged the languages, as this has nothing to do with either C or C++. –  Puppy May 29 '11 at 20:33
    
ATI card, I guess? –  Christian Rau May 29 '11 at 20:43
1  
If the described solution is correct, then the infolog string would have had a syntax error message in it. –  Chris Dodd Jun 1 '11 at 16:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I notice that each line is a quoted string separated by commas. In C/C++ you would usually just juxtapose quoted strings when creating a single big string, so I wonder if you are doing something strange like initializing an array of strings and not taking into account that its size has changed after adding a new line?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.