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I have an object that holds alerts and some information about them:

var alerts = { 
    1: {app:'helloworld','message'},
    2: {app:'helloagain',message:'another message'}
}

In addition to this, I have a variable that says how many alerts there are, alertNo. My question is, when I go to add a new alert, is there a way to append the alert onto the alerts object?

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2  
I think you have a problem with your posted json: 1:{app:'helloworld','message'} => 1:{app:'helloworld',message : 'a message'} ? –  Andreas Grech Mar 5 '09 at 22:49
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6 Answers

up vote 110 down vote accepted

How about storing the alerts as records in an array instead of properties of a single object ?

var alerts = [ 
    {num : 1, app:'helloworld',message:'message'},
    {num : 2, app:'helloagain',message:'another message'} 
]

And then to add one, just use push:

alerts.push({num : 3, app:'helloagain_again',message:'yet another message'});
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jQuery $.extend(obj1, obj2) would do this for you.

var alerts = { 1:{app:'helloworld','message'},2:{app:'helloagain',message:'another message'} }

$.extend(alerts, {app:'new',message:'message'});

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JQuery's extend is slow: trevmex.com/post/2531629773/jquerys-extend-is-slow. Also, there is a typo. $.extends() should read $.extend(). –  ken Apr 4 '11 at 18:59
    
Good catch with the typo. There are situations where $.extends is helpful but you are right that it should be avoided when possible. –  respectTheCode Apr 5 '11 at 14:47
1  
I think extend() is ok when you only have a one record structure, without the brackets, for the rest I agree with respectTheCode, just use push() –  elvenbyte Feb 6 '12 at 10:56
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You should really go with the array of alerts suggestions, but otherwise adding to the object you mentioned would look like this:

alerts[3]={"app":"goodbyeworld","message":"cya"};

But since you shouldn't use literal numbers as names quote everything and go with

alerts['3']={"app":"goodbyeworld","message":"cya"};

or you can make it an array of objects.

Accessing it looks like

alerts['1'].app
=> "helloworld"
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Do you have the ability to change the outer-most structure to an array? So it would look like this

var alerts = [{"app":"helloworld","message":null},{"app":"helloagain","message":"another message"}];

So when you needed to add one, you can just push it onto the array

alerts.push( {"app":"goodbyeworld","message":"cya"} );

Then you have a built-in zero-based index for how the errors are enumerated.

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Try this:

alerts.splice(0,0,{"app":"goodbyeworld","message":"cya"});

Works pretty well, it'll add it to the start of the array.

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alerts.unshift({"app":"goodbyeworld","message":"cya"});
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