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I am having trouble adding an item to my array set, it should be ordered in ascending order and for some reason I just get to add it and it does not order it.

Here is my code:

public boolean add(AnyType x){
    if(this.contains(x))
        return false;
    else if(this.isEmpty()){
        items[theSize]=x;
        theSize++;
        return true;
    }
    else{
    if( theSize == items.length )
        this.grow();
    //Here goes code for adding
    /*AnyType[] newItems = (AnyType[]) new Comparable[items.length];
    newItems = items;
    for(int i=0;i<theSize;i++)
        if(items[i].compareTo(x)>0){
            newItems[i]=x;
            newItems[i+1]=items[i];
            for(int j=i+1;j<theSize;j++)
                newItems[j]=items[i];
            items = newItems;
            theSize++;
            return true;
        }

    //*/
    items[theSize]=x; //*/
    theSize++;
    return true;
    }
}

The method should not allow an item to repeat so if you try to add something that is already in there, it should return false. If the array is empty just add to items[0] and then I tried to create a new array and once you find an item bigger than the one I'm inputing copy everything into a new array, add the new value, and just add the rest and then make items = newItems; but it did not work. I have been trying for a couple hours now so I just decided to ask for help. I have my SortedSet class defined like this:

public class SortedSet<AnyType extends Comparable> implements Set<AnyType>
{
    private AnyType[] items;
    private int theSize;
    public SortedSet(){
        theSize = 0;
        items = (AnyType[]) new Comparable[5];
    }

I know there are other ways to do this like using TreeMap but it has to be done as an array.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
So, you tagged your question with [sortedset], which sounds like you already know about SortedSet. In fact, TreeSet or the like would be the correct way to implement what you want to do. –  Chris Jester-Young May 29 '11 at 22:04
    
@Chris See edit. –  randomizertech May 29 '11 at 22:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I do not see where you are writing the previous values?

Try something like this in the last else.

            theSize++;
            AnyType[] newItems = new AnyType[theSize];
            for(int i = 0; i < theSize-1; i++)
                if(items[i].compareTo(x) > 0)
                {
                    newItems[i] = x;
                    newItems[i + 1] = items[i];
                    for(int j = i + 2; j < theSize; j++)
                        newItems[j] = items[j-1];
                    items = newItems;
                    return true;
                }
                else
                    newItems[i] = items[i];
            newItems[theSize-1] = x;
            items = newItems;
            return true;

Since I already coded it to make sure it works fine, here is a sample working on Strings. I focused here only on correct adding. The other issues important for the OP were omitted.

import java.util.Arrays;

public class OrderingAddTest
{
    static int theSize = 0;
    static String[] items = new String[theSize];
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        add("a");
        add("e");
        add("d");
        add("b");
        add("c");

        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(items)+"\n; items.length="+items.length);
    }

    private static boolean add(String x)
    {
        theSize++;
        String[] newItems = new String[theSize];
        for(int i = 0; i < theSize - 1; i++)
            if(items[i].compareTo(x) > 0)
            {
                newItems[i] = x;
                newItems[i + 1] = items[i];
                for(int j = i + 2; j < theSize; j++)
                    newItems[j] = items[j - 1];
                items = newItems;
                return true;
            }
            else
                newItems[i] = items[i];
        newItems[theSize - 1] = x;
        items = newItems;
        return true;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I edited it to my program following the same structure and I ad 5, 6 and 7 and then I go to add a three and I just get 3 3 3 null –  randomizertech May 29 '11 at 22:34
    
@fgualda87 please do check if you have the current version as I have edited it slightly. Plus you are sure you are increasing the size accordingly? –  Boro May 29 '11 at 22:36
    
@fgualda87 check out if the for loop with j's you have something like this newItems[j] = items[j-1]; because you had i there. instead of j-1 thus you had the same value all the time. Plus the j loop should start from i+2 as at i+1 you already add something. –  Boro May 29 '11 at 22:41
    
@Boro Yes, I am getting a Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException: -1 at that line newItems[j]=items[j-1]; –  randomizertech May 29 '11 at 22:50
1  
@Boro I'm so lazy, and if is possible, then I using Arrays.sort(items, Collections.reverseOrder()); Arrays.sort(items); that allows index from -> to, with or without Comparator ... +1 –  mKorbel May 29 '11 at 23:31

There is already a native Java class that have theses features: java.util.TreeSet.

In a Set, the same element cannot appear twice. The "add" method returns a boolean: true if the item was added, false if it was already in the set.

TreeSet is an implementation of "SortedSet", that maintain an order on the elements. Your items only have to implement "Comparable".

share|improve this answer
    
Yes but I have to define it myself –  randomizertech May 29 '11 at 22:08
    
I know there are other ways to do this, but it has to be this way, that's why I'm asking –  randomizertech May 29 '11 at 22:09
    
If you have to implement the same feature, you can look at the source code of TreeSet (source are available in the JDK): you will have indications about the native implementation and you'll can get inspiration for your own implementation. –  Benoit Courtine May 29 '11 at 22:11

Your items is of the same size as of items, it should be Size+1

I guess you got a problem here

for(int j=i+ 1; j < theSize;j++)

newItems[j]=items[i];

here j is incrementing for sure, but there is no increment operation given for i, so all the newitems in this loop are being assigned the same value


EDIT :

    int i;

    for(i=0; i < theSize+1 ; i++)
    if(items[i].compareTo(x)>0){
    newItems[i]=x;

    for(;i<theSize + 1; i++)
     newItems[i]=items[i-1];

: do whatever next.

EDIT 2 :

U are doing a wrong thing here also,

items = newItems;

and the previous assigning statement (newItems=items)

you can't equate them as they are not of same size, you can do that if you use Pointer, (Using Pointers here will make this task A LOT easier,)

share|improve this answer
    
But the rest should be done by the other for loop before this one, that one increments i, no? –  randomizertech May 29 '11 at 22:17
    
NO, the loop that increments i works only till the if statement is not true, coz after that you return true before the i could iterate to next...Check the edit. –  TarunG May 29 '11 at 22:32
    
I get unreachable code error after the break; –  randomizertech May 29 '11 at 22:42
    
removed it already,, –  TarunG May 29 '11 at 22:45
    
@TarunG what are you using for the size of the new array? AnyType[] newItems = (AnyType[]) new Comparable[theSize];? just theSize? –  randomizertech May 29 '11 at 22:54

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