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I'm trying to learn x86 on my own and I decided to dissect a simple c program and see what GCC outputs. The program is this:

#include <stdio.h>
int main() {
  printf("%s","Hello World");
  return 0;
}

I compiled the code with -S and then stripped out things that I found unnecessary and reduced the assembly code to this.

.pfArg:
.string "%s"
.text

.Hello:
.string "Hello World"
.text

.globl main
.type   main, @function

main:
pushq   %rbp        # push what was in base pointer onto stack
movq    %rsp, %rbp  # move stack pointer to base pointer
subq    $16, %rsp   # subtract 16 from sp and store in stack pointer

# prepare arguments for printf
movl    $.Hello, %esi   # put & of "Hello World" into %esi
movq    $.pfArg, %rdi   # put & of "%d" into %eax
call    printf
leave
ret

Now almost everything in the code above makes sense to me except the first two under main. Although this is what I get without stripping things out.

.LC0:
    .string "%s"

.LC1:
    .string "Hello World"
    .text

.globl main
    .type   main, @function

main:

.LFB0:
    pushq   %rbp        # push what was in base pointer onto stack
    movq    %rsp, %rbp  # move stack pointer to base pointer

  # prepare arguments for printf
    movl    $.LC0, %eax # put arg into %eax
    movl    $.LC1, %esi # put second arg into %esi
    movq    %rax, %rdi  # move value in %rax to %rdi ???? ( why not just put $.LCO into %rax directly )
    movl    $0, %eax    # clear out %eax ???? ( why do we need to clear it out )
    call    printf      
    movl    $0, %eax    # return 0
    leave
    ret

.LFE0:
    .size   main, .-main
    .ident  "GCC: (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.5.2-8ubuntu4) 4.5.2"
    .section    .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits

There are 2 instructions that I've marked with ???? that I don't understand.

The first instruction is moving what is in %rax into %rdi to prepare for the printf call. Thats all fine except we just moved $.LC0 (which is the string "%s") into %eax. This seems unnecessary why didn't we just move $.LC0 into %rdi in the first place instead of moving it into %eax and then into %rdi?

The second instruction is clearing out %eax which I understand to be the return value of a function. But if the function is going to just clobber it anyways why do GCC care to clear it out?

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2  
Looks like you are using a x86-64 compiler rather than x86. –  msandiford May 29 '11 at 23:17
    
Yeah you are right I forgot to say that. –  spartacus Jul 10 '11 at 3:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The first instruction is moving what is in %rax into %rdi to prepare for the printf call. Thats all fine except we just moved $.LC0 (which is the string "%s") into %eax. This seems unnecessary why didn't we just move $.LC0 into %rdi in the first place instead of moving it into %eax and then into %rdi?

That’s probably because you’re compiling with no optimisations. When I compile your example with GCC 4.2.1 on Mac OS X v10.6.8, I get the following output:

.globl _main
_main:
LFB3:
    pushq   %rbp
LCFI0:
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
LCFI1:
    leaq    LC0(%rip), %rsi
    leaq    LC1(%rip), %rdi
    movl    $0, %eax
    call    _printf
    movl    $0, %eax
    leave
    ret

As you can see, the arguments were directly stored into %rsi and %rdi.

The second instruction is clearing out %eax which I understand to be the return value of a function. But if the function is going to just clobber it anyways why do GCC care to clear it out?

Because the x86_64 ABI specifies that if a function takes variable arguments then AL (which is part of %eax) is expected to hold the number of vector registers used for the arguments to that function call. Since you’re not specifying floating-point arguments when calling printf(), no vector registers are used, so AL (%eax) is zeroed out. I give more examples in an answer to another question here.

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Thanks! The second part of your answer was the type of information I was looking for. I'm not trying to make my code faster per say I'm just trying to figure out why it is doing what it is doing. Although as someone already mentioned maybe it isn't worth it. –  spartacus Jul 10 '11 at 3:52
    
@spa The first part of your question is related to what’s called register allocation in compiler implementation. When you compile your code with no optimisations, register allocation can be quite dumb. However, if you ask the compiler to optimise your code via -O (e.g. -O3), then it’ll use smarter register allocation algorithms. –  Bavarious Jul 10 '11 at 3:55
    
@spartacus, rewriting your code in assembler is an absolute no-no when tuning for performance (any small change in the computer's architecture, back to square one), writing performance-critical snippets in assembler is the very last resort. Take a look at Bentley's "Programming Pearls" (cs.bell-labs.com/cm/cs/pearls). –  vonbrand Jan 31 '13 at 13:18
    
@vonbrand I agree with you about not writing in assembler for performance. However that isn't what I was doing. This was purely an academic exercise for me in learning about why compilers do what they do. –  spartacus Feb 1 '13 at 15:00

Are you viewing the optimized output, or unoptimized (which is basically a naive translation of C code into assembler)? That makes a huge difference as the optimizer is usually pretty good about applying the same kinds of rules as you describe.

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I was using unoptimized. –  spartacus Jul 10 '11 at 3:48

Because GCC is a compiler, and compilers are dumb.

You can make GCC smarter by using -O2. It starts to use optimization tricks and reduces the redundant instructions.

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Yeah I understand that most compilers are dumb. I guess I just figured it had a reason. –  spartacus Jul 10 '11 at 3:49
    
Unless you ask the compiler to expend extra resources writing smarter code, the code it generates is quick and dirty (and generally dumb). For a long time now compilers are capable of generating code that is better than code written directly by an experienced assembly programmer (unless the human takes the time to carefully write the very best code possible, and that can well take a few hours for some dozen lines, probably to beat the compiler by a few percent on average). Modern CPUs are very complex beasts, not at all similar to the naïve idea taught in introductory programming classes. –  vonbrand Jan 31 '13 at 13:30

A couple rules of thumb:

  1. Don't bother looking at unoptimized output if you're concerned about efficient code.
  2. Always measure, never assume, that your "improvements" at the assembly language level boost performance.

Even in optimized code, you may see seemingly unnecessary instructions such as "xor %eax,%eax" when there is no functional need to clobber a register. These instructions play a special roll by informing the pipeline that no data dependency for that register exists beyond that point. In a modern out-of-order processor, the core's pipeline speculatively executes many instructions ahead of the current EIP. Explicitly cutting data dependencies in this manner helps the speculation mechanism and can boost performance in tight loops especially.

In other cases, the compiler may apparently take a round-about approach when in fact it's trying to match the work at hand to the parallel execution units available in the target core's pipeline. More instructions dispatched in parallel often complete faster than fewer instructions serialized.

If you really care to squeeze out every last drop of performance, use a rdtsc instruction before and after a block of code to measure the number of clocks expended. Be a bit careful, since rdtsc isn't strictly ordered with surrounding instructions, but in practice measuring it's plenty accurate for anything in the 1000's of clocks range.

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