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struct Text{
       int length;
       char *txt;
};
void print(struct Text myTxt)
{
     while ( myTxt.txt < myTxt.txt + myTxt.length )
     {
           printf("%c", ++myTxt.txt);
     }
}
int main()
{
    struct Text myText;
    char test[] = "long long test text";

    myText.length = sizeof (test) / sizeof (char);
    myText.txt = test;

    print(myText);

    gets();
    return 0;
}

I know that print function is wrong, but how to fix it.

share|improve this question
    
printf("%s", myText.txt); –  karlphillip May 29 '11 at 23:32
    
Is your struct's string supposed to be able to contain any null bytes (\0) other than the trailing one? If not, then just use "%s", as mentioned by karlphillip and me. –  Regexident May 30 '11 at 0:02

5 Answers 5

Your problem is print modifies the struct passed into it. Specifically, to print each character, you're incrementing myTxt.txt and then printing that. Your while loop is also incorrect: myTxt.txt < myTxt.txt + myTxt.length will always be true if myTxt.length is greater than zero.

You can fix it like this:

void print(struct Text myTxt)
{
     char *txt = myTxt.txt;
     while ( txt < myTxt.txt + myTxt.length )
     {
           printf("%c", *txt++);
     }
}

This sets txt to myTxt.txt, so you can modify txt without modifying myTxt.txt.

share|improve this answer
    
Alternatively you could use for (int i = 0; i < myTxt.length; i++) { printf("%c", myTxt.txt[i]); }. This way you're not touching any pointers in first place. –  Regexident May 29 '11 at 23:49
    
this code fails –  Kanad May 29 '11 at 23:51
    
@Regexident: I was trying to keep the code as similar to the original as possible. –  icktoofay May 29 '11 at 23:53
    
@Kanad: Whoops, it should work now. You were previously using ++txt. It needed to be *txt++. –  icktoofay May 29 '11 at 23:56
    
@Kanad: icktoofay's code works fine for me. And so does my for loop variation of it. @icktoofay: That's what I assumed. ;) I just prefer to avoid pointer shifts though whenever possible. ;) –  Regexident May 29 '11 at 23:58

Assuming myTxt.length is greater than zero, myTxt.txt < myTxt.txt + myTxt.length is always true.

So your while loop never terminates.

[Edit]

Well, I suppose it terminates once the addition overflows an int. Still probably not what you intended.

share|improve this answer

This should be alright:

void print(struct Text myTxt) {
    printf("%s", myTxt.txt);
}

(This of course requires myTxt.txt to be null-terminated but for c string this is common anyway.)

So unless your string should be able to contain additional null bytes you could change your code to this:

struct Text{
       char *txt;
};
void print(struct Text myTxt)
{
    printf("%s", myTxt.txt);
}
int main()
{
    struct Text myText;
    myText.txt = "long long test text";
    print(myText);
    return 0;
}

You can get the string's length by calling
strlen(myTxt.txt);
which IIRC requires:
#include string.h

share|improve this answer
    
What if myTxt.txt contains null bytes? –  icktoofay May 29 '11 at 23:33
    
Well, Kanad asked for printing "text from structure in c". Text (a.k.a strings) in C usually contains exactly one null byte at the very end. –  Regexident May 29 '11 at 23:36
    
It's true that they usually contain a null byte at the end, but having a struct with a length and a char * usually means that it's for the purpose of being able to hold null bytes. –  icktoofay May 29 '11 at 23:38
    
Absolutely true. Another possibility however could be Kanad is simply new to C and not familiar with null termination in C strings (thus using an additional length field), which I kinda took for granted given this being his very first question at SO. Well, we'll see, I guess ;) –  Regexident May 29 '11 at 23:47
    
I assumed it was homework. –  icktoofay May 29 '11 at 23:49

Try:

void print(struct Text myTxt)
{
     int i = 0;
     while (i < myTxt.length )
     {
           printf("%c", myTxt.txt[i]);
           i++;
     }
}

What you did wrong: you printed the addresses of each character, and incrementing it.

what mytxt.txt is doing is mytxt.txt = mytxt.txt + 1; therefore you are creating an infinite loop when you are checking the argument for the while loop.

share|improve this answer

If you need to support NULL bytes:

#include <ctype.h>
#include <stdio.h>
void print(struct Text *myTxt)
{
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < myTxt->length; i++)
    {
        if (isprint(myTxt->txt[i]))
        {
            printf("%c", myTxt->txt[i]);
        }
        else
        {
            int num = (int)((unsigned char)myTxt->txt[i]);
            printf("\\%x", num);
        }
    }
}

If you don't:

#include <stdio.h>
void print(struct Text *myTxt)
{
    printf("%s", myTxt->txt);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I updated print to output all non-printable characters as "\xx" where xx is the hex code for the char. –  Node May 30 '11 at 9:23

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