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I have a client and a server, both written in Python 2.7.

Lets say I wanted to make a multiplayer game server (which I don't at the moment but I'm working towards it). I would need to keep the server up to date (and other clients) on my characters whereabouts, correct?

How would I do this with sockets? Send or request information only when it is needed (e.g the character moves, or another players character moves and the server sends the information to other clients) or would I keep a constant socket open to send data real-time of EVERYBODY's movement regardless of if they have actually done something since the last piece of data was sent or not.

I won't struggle coding it, I just need help with the concept of how I would actually do it.

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It looks like you need to hammer out the architecture of your game before you start asking about Python-specific questions. These are the kinds of questions anyone has to ask when it comes to online games and you're not the first to ask here either. –  Steve Howard May 29 '11 at 23:31
    
The thing is im not looking to make a game just yet, im struggling on understanding how i would make a socket server work in this way. –  Brandon Ingham May 29 '11 at 23:34
    
be careful sharing too much data with all your clients. –  sarnold May 29 '11 at 23:46
    
The best way to approach this heavily depends on the style of game you are making. –  Winston Ewert May 30 '11 at 1:33

2 Answers 2

With TCP sockets it is more typical to leave the connections open, given the teardown & rebuild cost. Eventually when scaling you will do look into NewIO\RawIO.

If you do not, imagine that the game client might take a step & not get confirmation if sending it to the server & other players.

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Definitely keep the socket open, but you should consider using something like ZeroMQ which gives you more kinds of sockets to work with.

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