Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to create an array (enum) of array (enum) of array (enum) of Strings. I don't think it is possible to achieve this in Java, but I have heard about EnumMap.

public class Tricky {

    public enum enumA { A1, A2, A3 };
    public enum enumB { B1, B2, B3 };
    public enum enumC { C1, C2, C3 };

    HashMap<EnumMap<enumA, EnumMap<enumB, enumC>>,String> item
        = new HashMap<EnumMap<enumA, EnumMap<enumB, enumC>>,String>();

    public Tricky() {

        // How do I put and get strings in my hash map?


    }
}

The above code compiles, but how can I put and get string items in my map?

share|improve this question
    
What possible reason could you have for wanting to do this? EnumMap is just a really fast, efficient Map implementation when Enums are the keys, and something else is the values. –  I82Much May 30 '11 at 0:48
    
Are you trying to map a triplet of values, one from each of enumA, enumB, and enumC to a String? –  Ted Hopp May 30 '11 at 0:51
    
@Ted Hopp Yes, the idea is that I want to retrieve my string by providing enumA, enumB, and enumC. –  JVerstry May 30 '11 at 0:54
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

you might find this useful:

package p;
enum enumA {
    A1,A2,A3;
}
enum enumB {
    B1,B2,B3;
}
enum enumC {
    C1,C2,C3;
}
class MyArray{
    MyArray(Class<? extends Enum> e1,Class<? extends Enum> e2,Class<? extends Enum> e3) {
        strings=new String[e1.getEnumConstants().length][e1.getEnumConstants().length][e2.getEnumConstants().length];
        e3.getEnumConstants();
    }
    void set(enumA a,enumB b,enumC c,String string) {
        strings[a.ordinal()][b.ordinal()][c.ordinal()]=string;
    }
    String get(enumA a,enumB b,enumC c) {
        return strings[a.ordinal()][b.ordinal()][c.ordinal()];
    }
    public String toString() {
        StringBuffer sb=new StringBuffer();
        for(enumA a:enumA.values())
            for(enumB b:enumB.values()) {
                for(enumC c:enumC.values()) {
                    sb.append(get(a,b,c));
                    sb.append('\n');
                }
                sb.append('\n');
            }
        return sb.toString();
    }
    public static void main(String[] arguments) {
        MyArray myArray=new MyArray(enumA.class,enumB.class,enumC.class);
        for(enumA a:enumA.values())
            for(enumB b:enumB.values())
                for(enumC c:enumC.values())
                    myArray.set(a,b,c,""+a+b+c);
        System.out.println(myArray);
    }
    final String[][][] strings;
}
share|improve this answer
    
A very intersting approach indeed. Initialization of the structure is simpler... –  JVerstry May 30 '11 at 3:59
add comment

Shouldn't that be EnumMap<EnumA, EnumMap<EnumB, EnumMap<EnumC, String>>> ? In that case you would do

EnumMap<...> enumMapC = new EnumMap<...>();
enumMapC.put(EnumC.VALUE, "SomeString");
EnumMap<...> enumMapB = new EnumMap<...>();
enumMapB.put(EnumB.VALUE, enumMapC);
EnumMap<...> enumMapA = new EnumMap<...>();
enumMapA.put(EnumA.VALUE, enumMapB);

Although I would advise you to use a good IDE to code this. And you might want to consider to create some classes instead of using EnumMap directly to make it a bit more manageable.

If you use all positions in the arrays, you might want to use the ordinal value of the enum as an index into a normal array instead.

share|improve this answer
    
You might be right, I am testing something... –  JVerstry May 30 '11 at 1:07
add comment

public class Tricky {

public enum enumA { A1, A2, A3 };
public enum enumB { B1, B2, B3 };
public enum enumC { C1, C2, C3 };

HashMap<Object[],String> item = new HashMap<Object[],String>();

public Tricky() {
    item.put(new Object[] {enumA.A1, enumB.B2, enumC.C3}, "A1_B2_C3 string");
    String oops = item.get(new Object[] {enumA.A2, enumB.B3, enumC.C1});
}

}

That's pretty ugly code. To clean it up (and provide some type safety), you could define your own class for holding a triplet of enums, one from each of your enum types, and define its hashcode and equals methods. You may also find the method Arrays.hashcode(Object[]) useful.

share|improve this answer
    
That's an idea for sure... Thanks! –  JVerstry May 30 '11 at 1:09
add comment

Ok, here is the solution based on the suggestion made by @owlstead. It works:

public class Tricky {

    public enum enumA { A1, A2, A3 };
    public enum enumB { B1, B2, B3 };
    public enum enumC { C1, C2, C3 };

    static EnumMap<enumA,EnumMap<enumB,EnumMap<enumC,String>>> items;

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        // Creating my array (enum) of array (enum) of array (enum) of strings
        items = new EnumMap<enumA,
                        EnumMap<enumB,
                            EnumMap<enumC,String>>>(
                                enumA.class);

        // We need to add entries
        for (enumA itemA : enumA.values() ) {

            EnumMap<enumB,
                EnumMap<enumC,String>> itemsB =
                    new EnumMap<enumB,
                        EnumMap<enumC,String>>(enumB.class);

            // And sub-entries...
            for (enumB itemB : enumB.values())
                itemsB.put(itemB, new EnumMap<enumC,String>(enumC.class));

            items.put(itemA, itemsB);

        }

        // Putting a value
        items.get(enumA.A2).get(enumB.B3).put(enumC.C1, "MyValue");

        // Retrieving a value
        String retr = items.get(enumA.A2).get(enumB.B3).get(enumC.C1);
        String retr2 = items.get(enumA.A3).get(enumB.B3).get(enumC.C2);

        System.out.println(retr);
        System.out.println(retr2);

    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
I was thinking about this when I woke up and I think you might want to create an immutable class that holds the value of all three enums in a field, write a good equals() and hash() method, and then use that class as a key in a HashMap<MyThreeEnumClass, String>. But that's just a hint, not a direct answer to your question. –  owlstead May 30 '11 at 15:22
    
@owlstead What you are suggesting is indeed a solution, but it induces an extra class. I have finally implemented something similar to Ray's proposal. It is simpler code for the same features. Thanks. –  JVerstry May 30 '11 at 20:28
add comment

I do not think you've understood the concept of enumerations in Java; it is just like any other type. Consider it as a class if you must, for all enums in Java extend java.lang.Enum. You can therefore compose arrays of enums (or atleast their values/constants, if you that is what you meant). Take a look at the following example:

package com.example;

public class Enumerations {

    public enum enumA { A1, A2, A3 };
    public enum enumB { B1, B2, B3 };
    public enum enumC { C1, C2, C3 };

    private void test() {
        Enumerations.enumA[] enumerations = new Enumerations.enumA[3];
        enumerations[0] = enumA.A1;
        enumerations[1] = enumA.A2;
        enumerations[2] = enumA.A3;
    }
}

You cannot mix enums with other types in the array, if that is what you meant. In other words, you cannot create a multi-dimensonal array with different types: the type of the array is the same as the one specified in the declaration; that way an array declared to contain enums cannot contain strings, even if it is multi-dimensional. The following snippet therefore is illegal:

package com.example;

public class Enumerations {

    public enum enumA { A1, A2, A3 };
    public enum enumB { B1, B2, B3 };
    public enum enumC { C1, C2, C3 };

    private void test() {
        Enumerations.enumA[][] enumerations = new Enumerations.enumA[3][];
        enumerations[0][1] = enumA.A1; //legal
        enumerations[0][2] = enumB.B1; //illegal since enumB is a different type
    }

As far as your original question is concerned, using the EnumMap where the keys are enums is done in the following manner:

private void createAndStoreEnum() {
        EnumMap<Enumerations.enumA, String> aMap = new EnumMap<Enumerations.enumA, String>(enumA.class);
        aMap.put(enumA.A1, "Example");
}

The EnumMap constructor used, requires the type (of the enum used as keys) to be passed in as the argument. It can then be used like any other map, with the standard put and get semantics.

share|improve this answer
    
What I want to achieve is a kind of arrays or arrays etc... of enums to access a string. This is not a 1-level enum. It is a multilevel enum. May be this is not possible... –  JVerstry May 30 '11 at 0:57
    
@JVerstry, I think I've understood your problem to some extent. I've edited my answer to demonstrate why arrays won't help here. I think you need to use the enumMap. Hopefully the snippet will get you started. –  Vineet Reynolds May 30 '11 at 1:04
    
@JVerstry, I looked at your code in the question. How are you attempting to map the multi-level enum to the string? I think using a HashMap containing EnumMaps would be a step in the wrong direction. –  Vineet Reynolds May 30 '11 at 1:11
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.