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I am reading a file like:

31 0A 34 0A 31 0A 38 0A 34 0A 33 0A 36 0A 31 0A 31 0A 39 0A 31 30 0A 31 30 0A 35 0A 35 0A 31 30 0A 31 0A 33 0A 36 0A 33 0A 31 30 0A 35 0A 31 0A 31 30 0A 39 0A 35 0A 38 0A 33 0A 36 0A 34 0A 33 0A 36 0A 35 0A 31 30 0A 37 0A 32 0A 36 0A 33 0A 36 0A 35 0A 31 30 0A 37 0A 39 0A 33 0A 36 0A 32 0A 36 0A 35 0A 34 0A 0A 30 20 31 20 34 37 32 37 0A 30 20 33 20 36 33 36 33 0A 30 20 34 20 33 36 35 37 0A 30 20 35 20 33 31 33 30 0A 30 20 36 20 32 34 31 34 0A 30

I am planning to reading The first part of the file with the following code, until to find the sequence 0A 0A:

readed = fscanf(f,"%s", str_aux); 

After 0A 0A I need to read with the following sentence:

readed = fscanf(f,"%s %s %s", str_aux1, str_aux3, str_aux3);

How i could detect the 0A 0A in order to start reading the second part of the file.

I would like to use the following structure:

while (something){

   readed = fscanf(f,"%s", str_aux);
}

while (fscanf(f, "%s %s %s", a,b,c)!= EOF){

...
...
}

some idea for something condition (inside the first while)?

I'm working on Linux.

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1  
To start with,I suggest reading the file as an hexadecimal instead of strings. –  Tom May 30 '11 at 1:08
4  
Do you mean it's a whitespace-delimited text file containing a sequence of two-digit hex numbers? Or is that a hex-dump of the file? –  R.. May 30 '11 at 1:10
    
The file is a hexdump. –  Guillermo Parada May 30 '11 at 1:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you insist on using fscanf, you can read one character at a time. For example,


int nl_count = 0;
char current;
while(nl_count < 2)
{
    readed = fscanf(f,"%c",¤t);
    /* check that readed == 1, throw error otherwise */
    if(current == 0x0A)
        nl_count++;
    else
        nl_count = 0;
}

I think this will do exactly what you want. This reads one character at a time until two consecutive 0x0A's (newlines) occur. Then the loop breaks and you can go on to the second while loop.

I'll agree with Seth, however, that fgets or fgetc would be more appropriate for the first loop.

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I might use fgetc and a state engine. Something like:

int state=0;
char d;
while ((d = fgetc(f)) >= 0) {
  if (d==0x0a)
   state++;
  else
   state = 0;
  if (state == 2)
   do_something();
}

I probably, though, would use fgets. Something like:

int state=0;
char line[MAXLINE];
while (fgets(line,sizeof(line),f))
  if (state == 0 && *line == 0x0a)
    state=1;
  else if (state == 1)
  {
    sscanf(line,"%s %s %s",a,b,c);
    do_something_else();
  }
}

In general I am very cautious about calling fscanf(). I've always found fscanf parsers pretty fragile. I'd be more likely to get the line via fgets or something and then parse the result.

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1  
I agree entirely, except I avoid sscanf as well. But I'm a parser guy. –  zwol May 30 '11 at 4:34

When you look at the source for the question, there are 13 hex numbers on most lines, which is an unusual number to choose. So, we can probably simply assume that the input is a white space separated sequence of hex numbers.

Therefore, it would seem logical to me (as to some of the commentators) to use a gethex() function to read the next information.

int gethex(void)
{
    int x;
    if (scanf("%2x", &x) != 1)
        x = -1;
    return x;
}

This can then be used to read characters:

int oc = 0;
int c;

while ((c = gethex()) != -1)
{
    if (oc != 0x0A || c != 0x0A)
    {
        oc = c;
        continue;
    }
    /* Read to 0x0A in a row - proceed as required */
    int a, b, c;
    if ((a = gethex()) == -1 ||
        (b = gethex()) == -1 ||
        (c = gethex()) == -1)
        ...error - unexpected EOF (or other format error)...
    ... Process a, b, c ...
}

Note that this stops, by design, if there is a mistake in the data - a character other than hexadecimal or white space.

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