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I'm looking at this company's database design, and would like to know the purpose of their design, ie store relationship in one table and the data in another, why do this?

They have this,

EMPLOYEE

  • Id (PK)
  • DepartmentId

EMPLOYEE_DATA

  • EmployeeId (PK)
  • First Name
  • Last Name
  • Position
  • etc...

Rather than this...

EMPLOYEE

  • Id (PK)
  • DepartmentId
  • First Name
  • Last Name
  • Position
  • etc...

...OR this...(employee can belong to many departments)

EMPLOYEE

  • Id (PK)
  • First Name
  • Last Name
  • etc...

EMPLOYEE_DEPARTMENT

  • Id
  • EmployeeId
  • DepartmentId
  • Position
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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Purpose of design is determined by business rules.
Business rules dictate entity (logical model perspective) / table (physical model perspective) design. No design is "bad" if it is built according to the requirements that were determined based on business rules. Those rules can however change over time -- foreseeing such changes and building to accommodate/future-proof the data model can really save time, effort and ultimately money.

The first and third example are the same -- the third example has an extraneous column (EMPLOYEE_DEPARTMENT.id). ORMs don't like composite keys, so a single column is used in place of.

The second example is fine if:

  • employees will never work for more than one department
  • there's no need for historical department tracking

Conclusion:

The first/third example is more realistic for the majority of real-world situations, and can be easily customized to provide more value without major impact (re-writing entire table structure). It uses what is most commonly referred to as a many-to-many relationship to allow many employees to relate to many departments.

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That's a link table, or join table, or cross table.. lots of different names.

How would you assign an employee to two different departments with your design? You can't. You can only assign them to one.

With their design, they can assign the same ID to multiple departments by creating multiple records with the employee ID and different department ID's.

EDIT:

You need to be more specific about what you're asking. Your first question seemed to be asking what the purpose of mapping table was. Then you changed it, then you changed it again.. none of which makes much sense.

It seems now that you are asking what the better design is, which is a totally different question than what you originally asked. Please state specifically what question you want answered so we don't have to guess.

EDIT2:

Upon re-reading, if this is the actual design, then no.. It does not support multiple department id's. Such a design makes little sense, except for one situation. If the original design did not include a department, this would allow them to add a department ID without modifying the original EMPLOYEE_DATA table.

They may not have wanted to update legacy code to support the Employee id, so they added it this way.

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See update, there is alternative design, for employee belonging to many departments. –  001 May 30 '11 at 2:32
    
@001 - Sounds more like scope creep to me. There is no reason to have both of them, as they do the same thing. The second one just includes a unique identity column for the relation. –  Erik Funkenbusch May 30 '11 at 2:34
    
What about performance? storage, which one is going to be better? or is it going to be the same? –  001 May 30 '11 at 2:38
    
@001 - It's impossible to say what the best or better way to design tables is without knowing all the requirements, which would be too much to post here. Database design is often more of an art than science, and making it perform well often means designing in non-intuitive ways. There's normalized data, and de-normalized data. Normalized data is frequently slower than denormalized, but normalized data favors readaiblity, maintainability, and robustness. There's always tradeoffs and you can't tell what is "best" without knowing a lot more about things. –  Erik Funkenbusch May 30 '11 at 2:42
    
@001 - Also, databases often evolve over time. They added a new table here, or changed things there, and they made the choices based on how little work they would have to do to change the supporting code. –  Erik Funkenbusch May 30 '11 at 2:45

If an employee can be in more than one department, then you would need a mapping table but I'd do it like the following:

EMPLOYEE
Id (PK)
First Name
Last Name


DEPARTMENT
Id (PK)
Name

EMPLOYEE_DEPARTMENT
EmployeeId_fk (PK)
DepartmentId_fk (PK)
Position

This would allow for multiple positions in multiple departments.

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I would do it like you have described as well! –  001 May 30 '11 at 2:35
    
Per the original model, and employee can only be in one department. –  squawknull May 30 '11 at 2:47
    
Erm, didn't I just give you that new design? What is your question now? Did I answer it at all? –  Fellmeister May 30 '11 at 2:53

You would do this if an employee can be a member of multiple departments. With the latter table, each employee can only belong to one department.

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See update, there is alternative design, for employee belonging to many departments. –  001 May 30 '11 at 2:32
    
With EMPLOYEE.Id as Primary Key, this pattern does seem quite strange. I can't think of a good reason to do that (though that doesn't mean there isn't one; it might give faster employee<->department lookups on your DBMS or something). –  mjec May 30 '11 at 2:37

The only remotely good reason for doing this is to implement an extension model where the master table identifying unique customers does not include all the data for customers that is not always necessary. Instead, you create one core table with the core employee data and and extension table with all the supplementary fields. I've seen people take this approach to avoid creating large tables with many columns that are rarely needed. However, in my experience it's typically premature optimization, and I wouldn't recommend it.

In contrast to many responses, the model included does not support multiple departments per employee - it is not a many to many mapping approach.

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you're right, with only the id as the PK, then it doesn't support multiple departments. I assumed that was an oversignt on the posters part, since it makes no real sense otherwise. –  Erik Funkenbusch May 30 '11 at 2:49

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