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I have a program that makes use of a list of words (say, all the words in /usr/share/dict/words). The list of words is never modified, so I think I should make it static final. But how do I make it final? My current implementation looks like this (I'm lazy-loading the list of words when it's needed, though I'm not sure the lazy part is necessary, since the list isn't exactly that large or slow to load):

private static List<String> WORDS; // adding a final modifier doesn't work here

private static List<String> getWords() throws IOException {
  if (WORDS == null) {
    List<String> words = new LinkedList<String>();
    String line;
    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("my_dictionary.txt"));
    while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) {
      words.add(line);
    }
    WORDS = words;
  }
  return WORDS;
}

In the code above, I'm not allowed to make WORDS final. Any suggestions on how to do so? (Does it really matter whether I make it final or not?)

EDIT: I guess one way to do it is via the following:

private static final List<String> WORDS = getWords();

private static List<String> getWords() throws IOException {
  List<String> words = new LinkedList<String>();
  String line;
  try {
    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("my_dictionary.txt"));
    while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) {
      words.add(line);
    }
  } catch (IOException e) {
    System.out.println("Error reading dictionary: " + e);
  }
  return words;
}

But this loses the lazy-loading part (though maybe that's not as important as being final? maybe I'm trying too hard to do things "by the book"?).

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I'm not sure how much benefit you get from final here, since the data is private. That said, it sounds like you don't need lazy initialization here at all (list not large). I'd use your edited version (made immutable with @jits suggestion). –  Michael Brewer-Davis May 30 '11 at 5:10
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could use an ImmutableList from the Guava libraries to prevent it from being modified.

So you could do something like this:

private static List<String> WORDS;

private static List<String> getWords() throws IOException {
  if (WORDS == null) {
    List<String> words = new LinkedList<String>();
    String line;
    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("my_dictionary.txt"));
    while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) {
      words.add(line);
    }
    WORDS = ImmutableList.copyOf(words);
  }
  return WORDS;
}
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2  
java.util.Collections.unmodifiableList also seems fine in this context (since the base list wouldn't be leaked). –  Michael Brewer-Davis May 30 '11 at 5:05
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The only way to do it would be to set the variable as a static final and then intialize it in the static section, as below:

static final Collection<String> WORDS;

static {
    try {
        WORDS = new ArrayList<String>();
        // Load dict into variable
    } catch (...) {...}
}

The problem is that there is no way to tell what happened if an exception is thrown. It will just stop executing the static block. If things were partially initialized, you won't know.

It's really probably better to setup the variable in a singleton and always get it that way. That will ensure that it's only ever initialized once.

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There are a couple of things to keep in mind:

  • When you declare the List final, it is only the object reference itself that's final. The contents of the List can still be modified. So, if you are trying to keep the List contents from being changed, final won't help you. You'll need some kind of Immutable collection, like Jits mentions.
  • You can assign a value to a final variable during class initialization, or in the constructor. So, you can go ahead and assign an empty List at class initialization, then lazy load whenever you want.
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On top of what MBCook said you can add a throw in the catch clause to throw the Exception as RuntimeException (unchecked) if you are sure that the failing condition is blocking (you have to be really sure though). For example, in my case I have a service (lazy loaded) and if it throws an unrecoverable exception, I don't want to go ahead, I want java to close (I would also like to ask here if this is a good technique :)).

static final ServiceClass mLazyService;

static {
    try {
        mLazyService = new ServiceClass ();
    } catch (Exception e) {
        throw new RuntimeException(e);
    }
}
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