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In the code below, myString is always initialized to null. I have to manually initialize in an init() or similar. As far as I can tell it is related to superclass/subclass but I don't understand the exact mechanism

public class A extends B {

    private String myString = "test";


    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new A();
    }

    public A() {
        super();

    }

    public void c() {
        System.out.println(myString);
    }

}

public class B {

    public B() {
        c();
    }

    public void c() {

    }
}
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2  
With the code posted new A() will always set the myString private variable to "test" before the constructor for A is invoked. See Hovercraft's comment. –  user166390 May 30 '11 at 4:59
    
Full code sample posted –  deltanovember May 30 '11 at 5:15
    
Rule of thumb: Inside a constructor do as little as possible to initialize the object and avoid calling public/protected methods of your own (because they might be overridden and this might lead to hard to find bugs). –  Arne May 30 '11 at 5:47
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The issue with your code is, that myString is initialized at the begin of the constructor of class A but right after the super constructor (i.e. class B). Since you access the variable before from the constructor of class B (indirectly via call to overriden methode c) your get this behaviour.

As a rule of thumb: if you want to avoid unexpected behavior do not call overriden methods before the constructor has been executed.

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Is there a "correct" way to do what I'm trying to such that I can initialize my variables at the beginning of my code for A instead of via a special init method? –  deltanovember May 30 '11 at 5:22
    
@deltanovember in your case (constant variable) it is sufficient to declare the variable as static. Otherwise I would suggest to follow the path you suggested and use a method init which does the job. –  Howard May 30 '11 at 5:23
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Add a call to c(); overidden method right after the object has been fully created and call to superclass constructor is done.

Change your code to this ..

public class A extends B {

    private String myString = "test";


    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new A();
    }

    public A() {
        super();
         c();     // Include the call to c(); here ...

    }

    public void c() {
        System.out.println(myString);
    }

}

public class B {

    public B() {

    }

    public void c() {

    }
} 

 // Output : test
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The main thing is I want the base class to do the architectural stuff. For example I might want vehicle to call switchOn(), drive(), brake() and leave implementation details to the subclasses –  deltanovember May 30 '11 at 5:46
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Thinking in Java Second Edition by Bruce Eckel, Behavior of polymorphic methods inside constructors (p. 337-339).

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