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I came across this line of code:

if( -f <filename> ) { ... }

-f appears to test whether the filename exists or not but I am not sure. Googling has not helped so far (it is hard to Google for "-f") and neither have my Perl books.

Can anyone please advise?

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The -f option is rather weird. Test for exist is -e, but -f is "plain file", which seems to be defined as "not special". It is not binary, because in my tests, a file returns true for both -B and -f. –  TLP May 30 '11 at 6:46
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The lesson to be learnt here is not relying on general Google results. Restrict to the domain perl.org: second result is what you were after. – Your books suck mightily if they do not mention -f. Better get those: <p3rl.org/book>; <books.perl.org/>; and there are also some fine recommendations on Stack Overflow, search the tags [perl] [books]. –  daxim May 30 '11 at 7:54
    
-f is nothing but syntactic sugar for that old familiar refrain, (statbuf.st_mode & S_IFMT) == S_IFREG. The operative question here is really what <filename> is, and that is much more interesting. –  tchrist May 30 '11 at 18:19
    
Assuming that you haven’t overloaded all the -X prefix unary operators (it’s either all of them or none of them), and also assuming you haven’t overloaded the <> circumfix iteration operator, then <filename> will do a scalar readline(*filename) — which depends on the value of $/ — and then pass that result back to the filetest operator. If will also do this for <$filename>, except now $filename is an indirect handle instead of a direct one like filename. However, if filename isn’t a legal identifier, then the File::Glob::bsd_glob function is called with that argument. –  tchrist May 30 '11 at 18:31
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5 Answers

up vote 20 down vote accepted

See perlfunc.

It lists all the perl built-in functions, including the "file test" ones:

-X FILEHANDLE
-X EXPR
-X DIRHANDLE
-X

Where -X is one of the following:

-r: File is readable by effective uid/gid.
-w: File is writable by effective uid/gid.
-x: File is executable by effective uid/gid.
-o: File is owned by effective uid.

-R: File is readable by real uid/gid.
-W: File is writable by real uid/gid.
-X: File is executable by real uid/gid.
-O: File is owned by real uid.

-e: File exists.
-z: File has zero size (is empty).
-s: File has nonzero size (returns size in bytes).

-f: File is a plain file.
-d: File is a directory.
-l: File is a symbolic link.
-p: File is a named pipe (FIFO), or Filehandle is a pipe.
-S: File is a socket.
-b: File is a block special file.
-c: File is a character special file.
-t: Filehandle is opened to a tty.

-u: File has setuid bit set.
-g: File has setgid bit set.
-k: File has sticky bit set.

-T: File is an ASCII text file (heuristic guess).
-B: File is a "binary" file (opposite of -T).

-M: Script start time minus file modification time, in days.
-A: Same for access time.
-C: Same for inode change time (Unix, may differ for other platforms)
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Also, you don't have to "just know" that the docs are in the perlfunc page to get at this documentation. You could have found the docs for -f by perldoc -f -f - just like you can find the docs for other functions by perldoc -f some_function. –  rohanpm May 30 '11 at 22:32
    
What is the definition of plain file? just asking. –  Jerry Lam Oct 9 '13 at 11:29
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Look for perl file test operators.

http://perldoc.perl.org/functions/-X.html

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In Unix, directories can contain the following types of files:

  • Plain (what you would consider a file)
  • Directory
  • Named pipe
  • Named socket
  • ...

-f tests if the provided name references a file that's a plain file. It will return undef (error ENOENT) if the file doesn't exist, or some other false values if the file exists but it's not plain file (e.g. if it's a directory).

-X operators

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if (-f <filename> ) { ... }

It seems that either I have misunderstood the question, or else everybody else has.

First, let’s make some assumptions.

  1. Let’s assume that you haven’t overloaded all the -X prefix unary operators (it’s either all of them or none of them),

  2. Let’s also assume that you haven’t overloaded the <> circumfix iteration operator.

Assuming that both of those two givens given above shoul hold, then the notation <filename> will do a scalar readline(*filename) — which depends on the value of $/ — and then pass that result back to the filetest operator for subsequent evaluation, usually but not necessarily by way of stat(2). That means that you had best have a filehandle open by the name of filename for this to work, unless truly deep wizardry is involved.

If will also do this for <$filename>, except now $filename is an indirect handle instead of a direct one like filename. Again, $/ is respected. Using a filename proper for the filehandle associated with it is actually something I do all the term. For example:

our $fn = "/etc/termcap";
open($fn, "<", $fn) || die "can't open $fn: $!";

That way the warn and die messages actually tell me the name of the file. For example:

while (<$fh>) {
     warn "oops" if whatever;
}

will tell me the line number and the name of the file at which I oopsted.

Now, if the operand of the <⋯> deviates from the rules for allowed unbraced dative objects, that is, a bareword prefixed by zero or more dollar signs, then it is not the iteration operator but the wildcard burster. This is true even without wildcards. It just has to violate Perl’s famous Rule of Datives, and that then triggers the alternate

This means that if and only if filename isn’t a legal bareword with zero or more leading dollar signs — such as for example /etc/termcap, /tmp, *.[Cchy], {,/usr}/bin/c?, or ~/Documents — then that familiar old conglobulation operator in the guide of the File::Glob::bsd_glob function is called instead, with exactly the sort of result you would expect of such a useful and commonly used function when supplied with the appropriate argument.

Here are many examples that show answers to the sort of question the quoted portion above is actually asking:

use v5.10;  # for the say feature, but not needed for conglobulation

if (-d <~joebob>                 ) { say "joebob has a home"                 }
if (-d <~joebob/.opera>          ) { say "joebob has an opera directory"     }
if (-d <~joebob/.ssh>            ) { say "joebob has an ssh directory"       }

if ($n = grep {-e} <~joebob/.*rc>) { say "joebob has $n RC files"            }

if (-f <~joebob/.exrc>           ) { say "joebob has a vi config file"       }
if (-f <~joebob/.profile>        ) { say "joebob has a sh profile"           }
if (-f <~joebob/.bashrc>         ) { say "joebob has a bash config script"   }
if (-f <~joebob/.cshrc>          ) { say "joebob has a csh config script"    }
if (-f <~joebob/.log{in,out}*>   ) { say "joebob has csh login/out scripts"  }

if (-S </tmp/.X*/X*>             ) { say "I smell an X11 socket"             }

if (-t STDIN && -t STDOUT        ) { say "smells pretty tty to me"           } 
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I suspect the OP meant <filename> as "placeholder for a filename" rather than that literal code. Even if they did mean that code, a discussion about why that's probably a mistake would be more useful to the OP than a dissertation on all the things <> can do. –  Schwern May 30 '11 at 20:28
    
@Schwern: The thing is that I really and truly do write stuff like open(FH, <~tchrist/foofile>) myself, so if -f <whatever> is perfectly normal in tchrist™ code. For a metasyntactic, I prefer something like open( ʜᴀɴᴅʟᴇ, ᴍᴏᴅᴇ, ɴᴀᴍᴇ ) || die when I can get away with it; that is, use ᴏʙʟɪQᴜᴇ sᴍᴀʟʟᴄᴀᴘs as metasyntacticisms (“metasyntagmata”?). But can’t quite do that here. Some people use ‹ᴡʜᴀᴛᴇᴠᴇʀ› the way I do in uniprops, but that almost looks too much like <ᴡʜᴀᴛᴇᴠᴇʀ> to me. –  tchrist May 30 '11 at 20:52
    
I'm sure you do use it. And I do wacky things, too. Things I would advise most other programmers against, cuz you have to consider your audience when answering a question. And the audience is not like us. We're the 99th percentile that gets to turn the lightning guns up to 10. –  Schwern May 31 '11 at 7:32
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It tests whether the object specified by <filename> is a plain file (as opposed to binary, or being a directory, etc.).

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Binary? If you mean non-textual, they're plain files as well. -f is used to distinguish from different types (like directory, FIFO, socket and so on), not different content. –  paxdiablo May 30 '11 at 6:37
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(Compare with -T) –  user166390 May 30 '11 at 6:39
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It is not opposite to binary. It is opposite to "special". –  TLP May 30 '11 at 6:48
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