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I have to define an infinite cyclist

enumInts::Cyclist Integer

containing all integers in the natural order with zero being the current element.

What I did is:

data Cyclist a=Elem (Cyclist a) a (Cyclist a) 

enumInts:: Cyclist Integer 
enumInts=Elem prev 0 next 
      where 
            prev=help2 enumInts 0 
            next=help1 enumInts 0 

-- Create positive part 
help1::Cyclist Integer -> Integer -> Cyclist Integer 
help1 prev n=present 
      where present=Elem prev (n+1) next 
                        where next=help1 present (n+1) 

-- Create negative part 
help2::Cyclist Integer -> Integer -> Cyclist Integer 
help2 next n=present 
      where present=Elem prev (n-1) next 
                        where prev=help2 present (n-1)

It is compiling itself. But I'm not sure if it works as it should... so I'd like to see its result for for eg. 11 units. It should be :-5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 values. Is it possible to see it? (I know its an infinite) but for eg. in fibonacci sequence we could use 'take 11 fibs' and it gave them. Here option 'take n..' doesn't work (hmm or it works but i dont know how to use it). I'd be grateful for your help..

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Is it a kind of exercise/homework? If not, perhaps you could clarify: Why do you need to define an inifinite cyclist? –  phynfo May 30 '11 at 7:53
    
Yes, thats my homework –  Tom May 30 '11 at 8:00
2  
I'm not convinced your choice of representation of Cyclist is the right one. It all depends on what operations you need to do on a Cyclist. –  augustss May 30 '11 at 9:59
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5 Answers 5

It's way past your deadline now, I'm sure, so I had fun dealing with the doubly-infinite Integers:

Allowing a finite part

To make a take function, I'll have to edit your type so that it can be finite:

data Cyclist a=Elem (Cyclist a) a (Cyclist a) | Empty
  deriving Show

takeToDepth :: Int -> Cyclist a -> Cyclist a
takeToDepth 0 _ = Empty
takeToDepth n (Elem c1 a c2) 
      | n >0 = Elem (takeToDepth (n-1) c1) a (takeToDepth (n-1) c2)
      | otherwise = Empty
takeToDepth n Empty = Empty

But now we can see a mistake in your data type:

*Main> takeToDepth 1 enumInts
Elem Empty 0 Empty
0 -- I've drawn the tree

and

*Main> takeToDepth 2 enumInts
Elem (Elem Empty (-1) Empty) 0 (Elem Empty 1 Empty)

  0   
  |       -- looks OK
 ---      -- see the end of the answer for how I pretty printed
/   \
-1  1

It's looking OK so far, but:

*Main> takeToDepth 3 enumInts
Elem (Elem (Elem Empty (-2) Empty) (-1) (Elem Empty 0 Empty)) 
 0 (Elem (Elem Empty 0 Empty) 1 (Elem Empty 2 Empty))

That's not the structure we want - it has three zeros in it!

     0     
     |     
   -----   
  /     \  
  -1    1  
  |     |  
 ---    -- 
/   \  /  \
-2  0  0  2    -- oops! We've re-created zero for 1 and -1

There are two 0s and two of every number in the end. It's even worse if we go deeper

*Main> takeToDepth 4 enumInts
Elem (Elem (Elem (Elem Empty (-3) Empty) (-2) (Elem Empty (-1) Empty)) (-1) 
 (Elem (Elem Empty (-1) Empty) 0 (Elem Empty 1 Empty))) 0 
 (Elem (Elem (Elem Empty (-1) Empty) 0 (Elem Empty 1 Empty)) 1 
 (Elem (Elem Empty 1 Empty) 2 (Elem Empty 3 Empty)))

                         0   
                         |                         
             --------------------------            
            /                          \           
            -1                         1           
            |                          |           
       -------------              -----------      
      /             \            /           \     
      -2            0            0           2     
      |             |            |           |     
   -------        -----        -----       -----   
  /       \      /     \      /     \     /     \  
  -3      -1     -1    1      -1    1     1     3  
  |       |      |     |      |     |     |     |  
 ---     ---    ---    --    ---    --    --    -- 
/   \   /   \  /   \  /  \  /   \  /  \  /  \  /  \
-4  -2  -2  0  -2  0  0  2  -2  0  0  2  0  2  2  4

We don't need all that stuff in the middle. What we want is more like

this = Elem (Elem (Elem (Elem Empty (-3) Empty) (-2) Empty) (-1) Empty) 
 0 (Elem Empty 1 (Elem Empty 2 (Elem Empty 3 Empty)))


  0  
  |  
 --- 
/   \
-1  1
|   |
-2  2
|   |
-3  3

That's good, but there are so many Emptys it's confusing.

Making a data type that does what you intend.

What we really need is a current element, somthing like a list stretching out to the right, and something like a list stretching out backwards to the left. The compiler doesn't have a sense of direction, so we'll use the same structure for both but remember to print the left hand side backwards on to the right hand side.

First we need a definitely-infinite list:

data InfiniteList a = IL a (InfiniteList a)         deriving Show

tailIL (IL _ therest) = therest
headIL (IL a _      ) = a

fromList [] = error "fromList: finite list supplied"
fromList (x:xs) = IL x (fromList xs)

toList (IL a therest) = a:toList therest

Now we can make it infinite in both directions:

data DoublyInfiniteList a = DIL {left  :: InfiniteList a,
                                 here  :: a,
                                 right :: InfiniteList a}
   deriving Show

enumIntsDIL = DIL {left = fromList [-1,-2..], here = 0, right = fromList [1..]}

Which looks like this:

  0  
  |  
 --- 
/   \
-1  1
|   |
-2  2
|   |
-3  3
|   |
-4  4

only with infinitely many elements, not just 9.

Let's make a way of moving about. This could be made more efficient with use of reverse, toList and fromList, but this way you get to see how you can mess with the parts of it:

go :: Int -> DoublyInfiniteList a -> DoublyInfiniteList a
go 0 dil = dil
go n dil | n < 0 = go (n+1) DIL {left  = tailIL . left $ dil,
                                 here  = headIL . left $ dil,
                                 right = IL (here dil) (right dil)}
go n dil | n > 0 = go (n-1) DIL {left  = IL (here dil) (left dil),
                                 here  = headIL . right $ dil,
                                 right = tailIL . right $ dil}

We can now convert to another datatype every time we want to be finite.

data LeftRightList a = LRL {left'::[a],here'::a,right'::[a]}  -- deriving Show

toLRL :: Int -> DoublyInfiniteList a -> LeftRightList a
toLRL n dil = LRL {left'  = take n . toList . left $ dil,
                   here'  = here dil,
                   right' = take n . toList . right $ dil}

Which gives

*Main> toLRL 10 enumIntsDIL
LRL {left' = [-1,-2,-3,-4,-5,-6,-7,-8,-9,-10], here' = 0, right' = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]}

but you probably want to print that so it looks like what you mean:

import Data.List  -- (Put this import at the top of the file, not here.)

instance Show a => Show (LeftRightList a) where    
 show lrl =    (show'.reverse.left' $ lrl)    -- doesn't work for infinite ones!
            ++  ",   " ++ show (here' lrl) ++ "   ," 
            ++ (show' $ right' lrl)  where
    show' = concat.intersperse "," . map show 

Which gives

*Main> toLRL 10 enumIntsDIL
-10,-9,-8,-7,-6,-5,-4,-3,-2,-1,   0   ,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10
*Main> toLRL 10 $ go 7 enumIntsDIL
-3,-2,-1,0,1,2,3,4,5,6,   7   ,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17

Of course we could have just converted to a list and shown that, but we'd have lost the ability to indicate where we were.

Appendix: How I pretty-printed the trees

import Data.Tree
import Data.Tree.Pretty

There are a few different types of trees etc lying about so I gave myself a class to convert them each to Tree:

class TreeLike t where
  toTree :: t a -> Tree a

treeTake :: Int -> Tree a -> Tree a
treeTake 1 (Node a _) = Node a []
treeTake n (Node a ts) | n > 1 = Node a (map (treeTake (n-1)) ts)
                       | otherwise = error "treeTake: attemt to take non-positive number of elements"

see :: (TreeLike t,Show a) => Int -> t a -> IO ()
see n = putStrLn.drawVerticalTree.fmap show.treeTake n.toTree

Which we use like this:

*Main> see 5 $ go (-2) enumIntsDIL
  -2  
  |   
 ---  
/   \ 
-3  -1
|   | 
-4  0 
|   | 
-5  1 
|   | 
-6  2 

First your Cyclist:

instance TreeLike Cyclist where
 toTree Empty = error "toTree: error - Empty"
 toTree (Elem Empty a Empty) = Node a []
 toTree (Elem Empty a c2) = Node a [toTree c2]
 toTree (Elem c1 a Empty) = Node a [toTree c1]
 toTree (Elem c1 a c2) = Node a [toTree c1,toTree c2]

Next the doubly-infinite list:

instance TreeLike InfiniteList where
 toTree (IL a therest) = Node a [toTree therest]

instance TreeLike DoublyInfiniteList where
 toTree dil = Node (here dil) [toTree $ left dil,toTree $ right dil]

And then the left-right-list:

instance TreeLike [] where
 toTree [] = error "toTree: can't make a tree out of an empty list"
 toTree [x] = Node x []
 toTree (x:ys) = Node x [toTree ys]

instance TreeLike LeftRightList where
 toTree lrl = Node (here' lrl) [toTree $ left' lrl,toTree $ right' lrl]
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When you want exactly those numbers, why not just use

enumInts :: Integer -> [Integer]
enumInts n = [-(n`div`2)..(n`div`2)]
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I don't that numbers. It have to work for infinite, but i'd like to see if it really works so I want to call it on some example num –  Tom May 30 '11 at 7:59
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Although it's built-in, you can imagine the list type as being defined as

data [a] = [] | a : [a]

take can be defined like this:

take 0 xs = []
take n (x:xs) = x:take (n-1) xs

You should try to see how you can tweak the definition of take for your own type.

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I think this can be solved as:

Our infinite data

myList = ([0] ++ ) $ conca­t $ [[x] ++  [-x] | x <- [1..]]

getting specific number of elements from this list:

takeOnly n = sort $ take n myList
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This is my solution:

enumInts :: Cyclist Integer
enumInts = Elem (goLeft enumInts) 0 (goRight enumInts)
    where
        goLeft this@(Elem left n _) = let left = Elem (goLeft left) (n-1) this in left
        goRight this@(Elem _ n right) = let right = Elem this (n+1) (goRight right) in right

and you can use it that way:

label . forward . backward . forward . forward $ enumInts

where:

label (Elem _ x _) = x
forward (Elem _ _ x) = x
backward (Elem x _ _) = x
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