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Here is a fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/5s7vv/

What I want to do is have 2 buttons floated left and 2 right, just like the example, but button_4 should be the rightmost element. However, I cannot achieve that by just a simple float right. I should change their order in the markup, but that breaks user experience (tabbing between buttons is in wrong order), which actually leads to my question.

Is it possible to float both buttons right, in the correct order and still keep their tab index, and of course without extra markup. (wrapping them in div is easy, but I really want to avoid that).

I know the tabindex property, but as far as I know its not well supported...


HTML Code:

CSS:

#container{
    width: 200px;    
}

#container a{
    width: 20px;
    height: 20px;
}

.button_1, .button_2{
     float: left;   
}

.button_3, .button_4{
     float: right;  
}

.button_1{background-color: blue;}
.button_2{background-color: red;}
.button_3{background-color: green;}
.button_4{background-color: yellow;}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

add this:

.button_3 {margin-right: 20px;}
.button_4 {margin-right: -40px;}

this makes them (3 & 4} "swap" places

or position: relative would probably work too

Update: using position relative seems to be more stable in IE..

.button_3, .button_4{
    float: right; 
    position: relative; 
}

.button_3 {left: -20px;}
.button_4 {left: 20px;}
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Worked well, thank you! –  NoBBy May 30 '11 at 8:21

It's a bit of a hack, but you could wrap buttons 3 and 4 in a div and right-float the div. That would keep the button order intact.

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I would do that if there is no better option –  NoBBy May 30 '11 at 8:21

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